Robert pattinson 2018 filmes

Oscar Watch - Post Venice/TIFF/NYFF Edition

2020.10.12 20:42 jonisantucho Oscar Watch - Post Venice/TIFF/NYFF Edition

Several months ago, right after the last Academy Awards, I posted a long, long, long list of possible contenders that had prospects to fight for the next Oscars. It was a time of hope, of looking forward, and of positivity.
Then, COVID-19 happened.
And now, we find ourselves in a year that may change the movie industry forever, with the lack of safety of theaters in times of a pandemic accelerating the switch of mainstream audiences to streaming and VOD. These are times where some people are beginning to wonder, even after they pushed the eligibility date for two more months, why the Academy doesn’t cancel next year’s Oscars. And in this rocky terrain, we lost many contenders. Fire up the Hunger Games cannons, because these are some casualties of the season (so far).
Launched to 2021: Annette, Benedetta, Deep Water, Dune, In the Heights, King Richard, Last Night in Soho, Memoria, Nightmare Alley, Passing, Red, White and Water, Raya and the Last Dragon, The Last Duel, The Power of the Dog, Tick, Tick… Boom!, West Side Story.
Unknown status / missing in action: After Yang, Blonde, Breaking News in Yuba County, C’mon C’mon, Next Goal Wins, Stillwater, The French Dispatch, The Humans, The Tragedy of Macbeth, The Eyes of Tammy Faye, Those Who Wish Me Dead.
But even if this year isn’t as loaded with clear awards candidates, there are plenty of movies that are already drawing buzz for an Oscar season that started brewing a month ago, with the kickoff of the Venice Film Festival, and will go on for six and a half more months, when the Academy Awards take place on April 25, 2021. It’s gonna be a long, weird and rocky season, which is gonna be great to see in terms of the narratives that are coming up.
-Ammonite (trailer): When people were betting on the likelier contenders of this year, many people pointed in the direction of Francis Lee’s period drama, with previous Best Actress winner Kate Winslet and constant nominee Saoirse Ronan. Going into the premiere at Toronto, people had their eyes set in this queer romance between a paleontologist and a young wife in the coasts of England during the 19th century. But then, some things happened. First, Winslet started her promotion of the movie by talking about her regret for working with Woody Allen and Roman Polanski that sounded unconvincing to the ominous Film Twitter. Then, another queer period drama, Mona Fastvold’s The World to Come, started to take the attention away at Venice. And finally, the movie premiered. The reaction? Cold. Critics came out mixed with the movie, with many of them comparing it negatively to last year’s Portrait of a Lady on Fire, and saying that it’s too dull and alienating. Does that mean that all is lost? Not exactly. While the movie (which, considering the genre, really needs critics' support to get into the Best Picture category) has been dismissed, the acting by Winslet and Ronan has been received positively. Now that so many other contenders have been dropping out of the year, they might get some room to campaign from a (social) distance.
-Another Round (trailer): Speaking of TIFF premieres, a film that had a better time at the Canadian festival was the reunion between director Thomas Vinterberg and star Mads Mikkelsen, who reunited years after making the stirring drama The Hunt (not the one with Betty Gilpin carrying a bad political satire, the one about a Danish teacher wrongly accused of sexual abuse). This time, the material is lighter, being a dramedy about four teachers who decide to test out a theory about how people can live and work a little better if they increase the level of alcohol in their blood. Critics really liked the way the movie dealt with alcoholism, and Toronto audiences made it a runner up for the People’s Choice Award of the festival. In a year without so much exposure from other festivals, this Cannes 2020 selection could make a candidate for the Best International Film category.
-Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (trailer): Surprise, new Borat film! While Sacha Baron Cohen made headlines several times this year because of stunts that people assumed were about a second season of Who is America?, the Internet was shocked when, in early September, it was confirmed that it was actually a very niiiiice return from the journalist character that made him famous, shot during quarantine. In a matter of weeks after the reveal, the sequel got sold to Amazon Prime and got a release date for October 23. Why so soon? Well, apparently the movie, which got him in trouble with Rudy Giuliani and other people, is about Borat taking his daughter on a road trip to give her as a bride to VP Mike Pence. Even if this movie doesn’t manage to achieve the feats of the 2006 movie (which got a Best Adapted Screenplay nomination, let’s remember), it will help Baron Cohen’s image a lot, because it will come a week after his big Oscar play.
-Cherry: While everybody knows them mostly because of their contributions to the MCU, directors Joe and Anthony Russo and actor Tom Holland are trying to branch out together. Now Apple has bought into their efforts, paying more than 40 million dollars to acquire their new crime drama, about the life of former Army medic Nico Walker, who started robbing banks after his days in Iraq left him with PTSD and a pill addiction. Will Holland manage this time to escape from the shadow of “oh, jeez, Mr. Stark” Spider-Man before Chaos Walking or the Uncharted movie come out? That’s a question for another day.
-Da 5 Bloods (trailer): Talk about timing. Merely days after the country was mobilized by the police brutality that continues to divide the United States, Spike Lee premiered his new war drama on Netflix. In a vibrant, disjointed but passionate portrait of four African American veterans who return to Vietnam to search for their fallen leader and some treasure, Lee struck gold yet again with his usual fans, even though the moving of the Oscar ceremony threatened to make it harder to remind Academy voters about this movie. However, with an astounding performance from Delroy Lindo (who is confirmed to be campaigned in the Best Actor category) and a supporting turn from Chadwick Boseman which got reframed with the news of his bravery in life and death, this has what it takes to fight for a spot in the Best Picture lineup.
-Everybody’s Talking About Jamie (trailer): When it became clear that quarantine wasn’t gonna be a breeze, the first movie in consideration wise enough to move a little further ahead in the calendar was this adaptation of the hit West End production about a gay British teenager who dreams of becoming a drag queen and get his family and schoolmates to accept his sexuality. With a release date on February 26, 20th Century Studios (man, it’s weird to not use Fox in that name) hopes to strike gold, with a cast that mixes young unknowns, familiar names (Sharon Horgan, Sarah Lancashire and my boy Ralph Ineson) and the previously nominated legend that is Richard E. Grant (who is playing a former drag queen named Loco Chanelle), now taking advantage of the move of other musicals like Annette, In The Heights and West Side Story. I mean, this has at the very least some Golden Globes nods in the bag.
-French Exit: Before its premiere as the closing film of the NYFF, many pundits were expecting this surreal comedy to be somewhat of a comeback for past Best Actress nominee Michelle Pfeiffer, who here plays a close to penniless widow who moves to Paris with her son (Lucas Hedges) and cat, who also happens to be her reincarnated husband (Tracy Letts). However, the first reactions for the film adaptation of the Patrick deWitt novel were all over the place, with some people feeling cold by the execution of the weirdness and others being won over. Still, everybody had good things to say about Michelle Pfeiffer’s performance, but after the mixed reception to the rest of Azazel Jacobs’ film she really would need a lot of critics support to get anywhere near the Best Actress category. With a release date on February 12, it seems that Sony Pictures Classics is skipping the critics awards, and the distributor has a couple of big competitors above this one.
-Good Joe Bell: Every year, there are movies with big stars that go to festivals full of hope for praises and awards. Some of them work and go on, others don’t and get forgotten about. Mark Wahlberg tried to remind people that he occasionally is a good actor with a true life drama where he plays a father who decides to walk across America to raise awareness about bullying after his son, tormented for being gay, commits suicide. The film by Reinaldo Marcus Green premiered at TIFF, and the reaction was… not great. Some critics defended it, but most saw it as a flawed, baity product starring a man with a history of hate. Still, it got bought by a distributor: Solstice Studios, a new player in the game which just released its first movie, Unhinged (yup, the one about Russell Crowe road raging). While they paid 20 million dollars for Good Joe Bell, it’s clear that this won’t get near the Oscar telecast.
-Hillbilly Elegy: While many movies this year have some level of anticipation, Film Twitter is bracing for this movie in the “is this gonna be the next Green Book?” way. Ron Howard’s adaptation of J.D. Vance’s memoir about his low income life in a poor rural community in Ohio has many fearing about the overuse of tropes involving what’s called white trash porn, but rarely, Netflix has kept silent about this release. Even though it has Oscar bridesmaids Glenn Close (7 nominations) and Amy Adams (6 nominations), the streamer has not even released a photo of the movie, which supposedly will come out in November. And if you want another bad omen, take a look at the lower levels of this list by a familiar voice.
-I’m Thinking of Ending Things (trailer): Speaking of Netflix, did you know that there is a new Charlie Kaufman there, right now? While his adaptation of the dark novel by Iain Reid, seemingly about a woman (Jessie Buckley) who is taken by her boyfriend (Jesse Plemons) to meet his parents (Toni Collette and David Thewlis), got the usual reception of confusion and praise that follows his movies, the release was followed for what befalls most of the Netflix original movies: a couple of days in the Top 10, and then it fell into the void. While Buckley and Plemons deliver great work in this demented, melancholic story, it’s hard to see this movie getting anything else than a Best Adapted Screenplay nomination for Charlie. And that’s a long shot.
-I’m Your Woman: Following the little seen but critically acclaimed Miss Stevens and Fast Color, Julia Hart started 2020 with a Disney+ adaptation of the YA book Stargirl, and now she follows it with a drama for Amazon that will have its world premiere as the opening film of the AFI fest on October 15. In this movie, Rachel Brosnahan hopes to translate her TV success with The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel to the big screen, playing a woman in the ‘70s that has to go on the run with her kid due to her husband’s crimes.
-Judas and the Black Messiah (trailer): Even if this doesn’t end up winning any awards, it has a real shot at being the best trailer of 2020. Formerly titled Jesus Was My Homeboy, this biographical drama by Shaka King tells the tale of two men: Fred Hampton (Kaluuya), an activist and Black Panther leader, and William O’Neal (Stanfield), the FBI agent sent to infiltrate the party and arrest him. While the trailer for this movie promised a release “only in theaters”, we shall see if Warner Bros backs down from that fight.
-Let Them All Talk: While we’re on the subject of Warner Bros, we have to mention what’s happening with HBO Max. While the start of the streaming service hasn’t been good (I mean, there are still people confused about that name) and it lead to some people assume will cause many firings, it has begun to make some buzzed titles on TV, like Close Enough, Raised by Wolves and the remains of the DC Universe failed streaming service. Now, to make a mark in the movie business, the streamer has a new Steven Soderbergh movie, a comedy that stars Meryl Streep as a celebrated author that takes her friends (Candice Bergen, Dianne Wiest) and her nephew (Lucas Hedges) in a cruise to find fun and come to terms with the past, while he flirts with a literary agent (Gemma Chan). While it doesn’t have a date yet, it’s confirmed to release in 2020, and at least we know that it can’t be worse than The Laundromat.
-Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom: While the expectations for the next film adaptation of an August Wilson acclaimed play were already high, the tragic death of Chadwick Boseman made this Netflix release one of the most anticipated movies of the season, considering this is his final movie. While past Supporting Actress winner Viola Davis takes the lead playing blues singer Ma Rainey in this tale of a heated recording session with her bandmates, her agent and her producer in 1927, Chadwick Boseman has a turn as the trumpeter Levee that was already being considered for awards, and now has even more people waiting to see. The thing is that one of the biggest competitions for Boseman this year will be Boseman himself, for his already acclaimed supporting turn on Da 5 Bloods, also released by Netflix. While the streamer will have to decide which of Chadwick’s performances will get the bigger campaign, this film by director George C. Wolfe has a cushy date set for December 18, and Viola is gunning hard for this movie to win.
-Mank (trailer): As you may have noticed by now, Netflix has a lot of plates spinning around this season, and this is the big one. After befriending the service with House of Cards and Mindhunter, David Fincher is going black and white to tackle a script by his late father Jack, about the making of the classic of classics, Citizen Kane. More specifically, the making of the script, with previous Oscar winner Gary Oldman playing the lead role of screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz, while accompanied by Amanda Seyfried, Lily Collins, Tuppence Middleton, Charles Dance and Tom Burke. After watching the first trailer of his satire of 1930’s Hollywood (that will release on streaming on December 4), it’s clear that this is gonna be catnip to old Academy voters, and it would be really hard for this to miss the Best Picture line up. Unless it’s a complete cinematic disaster, Mank is bank.
-Minari (trailer): While the last edition of Sundance took place in January, quarantine makes you feel like it took place two years ago. This year, the big winner of the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award in the US Dramatic Competition was a dramedy by Lee Isaac Chung, about a Korean family in the ‘80s who suddenly gets moved by their father (Steven Yeun) to Arkansas, to start a farm. Even though the reviews have been great, distributor A24 hasn’t really had a big, Oscar nominated hit for the last couple of years, and the COVID-19 crisis made them delay all their releases. But when we were ready to write this off, a new trailer for the movie came out, confirming that it’s in the game of this awards season. Maybe the pandemic will be of help to A24, considering that one of the reasons they haven’t had success is that they divided their attention into too many releases, and ended up getting not much. This time, they are betting all on Lee who, even if this doesn’t go anywhere, also has a new gig coming up as the director of the live action remake of Your Name.
-News of the World (sneak peek): So much of this year has felt like a game of chicken between a virus and movie studios. While many movies chose to skip this year altogether, Universal remains firm (for now) with its plans to open a wide movie on Christmas Day, with a Western that reunites Paul Greengrass and Tom Hanks in an enticing premise. In this drama based on Paulette Jiles’ novel, Hanks plays a traveling newsreader in the aftermath of the American Civil War, who is tasked with reuniting an orphaned girl with her living relatives. While the first sneak peek of the movie looks promising, the future is still in the air.
-Nomadland (trailer): While the world burns around Hollywood, Searchlight is betting big on Chloe Zhao’s new film. Using the strategy of taking the spotlight while the rest of the contenders is uncertain about how or when to be released, the indie drama began its journey at Venice, with critics raving about the story of a woman (two-time Oscar winner Frances McDormand) who, after losing everything in the Great Recession, embarks on a journey through the American West, living as a van-dwelling modern-day nomad. At the end of the fest, the movie won the coveted Golden Lion. To put that into perspective, the last three winners of the award were past Best Picture nominees The Shape of Water, Roma and Joker, with The Shape of Water (also distributed by Searchlight) also winning the big prize. After drawing critical acclaim following its virtual showing on TIFF and NYFF, Nomadland seems like the first lock in the Best Picture line up. Still, there are obstacles ahead. Will Zhao break the disappointment of the last few years, when deserving candidates for Best Director got blocked by the likes of Adam McKay and Todd Phillips? And will McDormand manage to get near a third Oscar, following a recent win for Three Billboards in Ebbing, Missouri? Time will tell.
-On the Rocks (trailer): While she hasn’t been near the Oscars for a while, Sofia Coppola is still a name that draws attention. This time, she opened the NYFF with a dramedy about a young mother (Rashida Jones) who reunites with her playboy father (Bill Murray, also reuniting with Sofia after Lost in Translation) on an adventure through New York to find out if her husband (Marlon Wayans) is cheating on her. The consensus seems to be that, while light and not near her best work, it’s still a fun and breezy movie, with a very good turn by Murray. While many would assume that this A24 production will disappear into the abyss when it releases on Apple TV+ on October 23, the dropping out of many candidates gives the movie a chance to, at least, fight for some Golden Globes.
-One Night in Miami (sneak peek): Following her recent Oscar and Emmy wins for If Beale Street Could Talk and Watchmen, Regina King is still striking hard, and this time, she’s doing it as a director. For her big screen debut as a filmmaker, she chose to adapt Kemp Powers’ play that dramatizes a real meeting on February 25, 1964, when Muhammad Ali (Eli Goree) followed an iconic win with a hangout session with Malcolm X (Kingsley Ben-Adir), Sam Cooke (Leslie Odom Jr.) and Jim Brown (Aldis Hodge). Opening at Venice, the film received glowing reviews, with many praising King (even though some said that the movie doesn’t fully translate the play to the film medium) and the actors’ performances, especially Ben-Adir and Odom Jr. (who, it should be said, also wrote an original song for the end credits of the movie, which could help his Oscar chances). Amazon Prime is hoping that this is their big contender this year, with plans of a theatrical release on Christmas and a streaming release on January 15. Judging by the praise this got at festival season, it has a chance to go a long way.
-Over the Moon (trailer): In a year with not that many contenders for Best Animated Feature, Netflix is betting on a musical adventure directed by the legendary Glen Keane, a classic Disney animator who recently won an Oscar for Best Animated Short for co-directing Dear Basketball. While our expectations were lowered by the first trailer for the movie, centered around a Chinese girl who builds a rocket ship and blasts off to the Moon in hopes of meeting a legendary Goddess, it’s still safe to assume that it has a shot at being nominated for something. Netflix also hopes that you like its big candidate for Best Original Song, which really, really sounds like a Disney ballad.
-Pieces of a Woman: While this year doesn’t have the amount of surprise contenders that a regular Oscar season usually has, we still have some movies that sneaked through festival season. The first one was the new, somber drama by Hungarian director Kornél Mundruczó, known for the doggy uprising pic White God, and the not-so-well-received sci-fi Jupiter’s Moon. This time, we follow a woman (Vanessa Kirby) whose life is torn apart after a home birth at the hands of a flustered midwife (Molly Parker) ends in tragedy, and then leads to a court battle that also makes her confront her husband (Shia LaBeouf) and her domineering mother (Ellen Burstyn). While the movie had mixed reactions, Kirby had plenty of raves in her direction, particularly concerning her performance during a 25-minute birth sequence that is said to be brutal. That brutality paid off, though, because Kirby ended up winning Best Actress at Venice, and Netflix bought the movie, which also has Martin Scorsese as an executive producer. If the Academy wants to crown a new face in the scene, Kirby is the one who will be targeted, following her acclaimed turn in The Crown and her supporting roles in blockbusters like Mission Impossible: Fallout and Hobbs & Shaw.
-Promising Young Woman (trailer): When theaters started to close because of the pandemic, Universal started the push of their movies going straight to VOD, with titles including Trolls World Tour and Never Rarely Sometimes Always. However, there was a title that was supposed to premiere in April, and then suddenly disappeared from existence. It was the directorial debut of actress Emerald Fennell, who wrote a black comedy with touches of a thriller, centered on a woman in her thirties (Carey Mulligan) whose bright future was derailed by a traumatic event, and who’s now looking for revenge. While the reaction to its premiere at Sundance wasn’t enough to consider a Best Picture run, the twisted performance by Mulligan earned her the best praise since the last time she was nominated for an Oscar, a decade ago for An Education. Now, Focus Features is planning to open the movie at Christmas, and are positioning Carey for a run at Best Actress.
-Rebecca (trailer): When the news came out saying that Ben Wheatley would adapt Daphne du Maurier’s psychological thriller novel for Netflix, many were shocked. Some people considered the chance that this was an awards play by the cult director, who is doing the same work that earned Alfred Hitchcock his only Best Picture win. But seeing the trailer for this new version, with Lily James playing the newly married young woman who finds herself battling the shadow of her husband's (Armie Hammer) dead first wife Rebecca, we have to wonder if there’s a point to the existence of this remake. We will find out if there’s any awards chances for this movie on October 21, when it releases on streaming. Let’s hope that Kristin Scott Thomas has something to play with as Mrs. Danvers.
-Respect (trailer): Every year, there’s one or two actors who announce to the world “I want an Oscar” and campaign like their lives depended on it. Last time, it was Taron Egerton (accompanied by Elton John, who actually ended up winning another Oscar). This year, it is the turn of Jennifer Hudson, who is playing Aretha Franklin in a biopic directed by first timer Liesl Tommy, and who’s hoping that this attempt at awards ends up more like Dreamgirls than like Cats. She has been doing announcement trailers (a year in advance), quarantine tributes, award show tributes, and every possible thing to get the industry to notice that she’s playing Aretha. Hey, Rami Malek and Renee Zellweger did it in the last few years, why can’t she. With a release date of January 15, Hudson wants that gold.
-Soul (trailer): Disney may be the studio that suffered the biggest hit because of the pandemic. Their parks are a loss, most of their big productions had to stop because of quarantine, and theaters in many parts of the world are closed. After the failure of Tenet for Warner Bros. and the experiment of the mouse house of charging people 30 dollars to see Mulan (which didn’t work at all), many wondered if Disney was gonna delay the new production by Pixar, written and directed by Pete Docter, who brought Oscar gold to his home with Up and Inside Out. The movie, which centers on a teacher (Jamie Foxx) who dreams of becoming a jazz musician and, just as he’s about to get his big break, ends up getting into an accident that separates his soul from his body, had a lot of promise, but the speculation of lost money was also a concern. Finally, Disney decided to release the movie on Christmas, but only on Disney Plus, causing another failure for theaters, but assuring that Disney at least can get more subscribers to its streaming service. And the movie? Well, it just premiered at the London Film Festival, and the critics are saying it’s Pixar at its best, with praises going from the look, to the script by co-director Kemp Powers (who also wrote the play of One Night in Miami, so he has many chances for a nod), to the score by Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross and Jon Batiste. That means that it’s already a top contender to win Best Animated Feature, and this may not be the only category in which the movie is gonna get nominated.
-Supernova (trailer): If there’s a theme this year in terms of Oscar contenders, it might be dementia. One of the examples of this is a small road movie directed by Hairy Macqueen, which premiered to good reviews at the San Sebastian festival. This drama centers on a trip taken by Sam (Colin Firth) and Tusker (Stanley Tucci), partners for 20 years, who travel across England reuniting with friends and family, because Tusker was diagnosed with early onset dementia. While usually the big awards role is usually the one of the person who suffers the illnesses, some reviewers are calling Firth’s work as the supporting companion some of the best of his career. With Bleecker Street buying the rights for a US release, this is a little film that could still make some moves.
-Tenet (trailer): For the first five months of quarantine, the big narrative in the world of film was “Christopher Nolan is gonna save cinemas”. But after postponing the release of the mind bending actioner for months on end, creating big demands and expectations to theater owners, and finally releasing as the sacrificial lamb of Hollywood, Warner Bros ended up seeing the opposite effect. Even though Tom Cruise loved to be back at the movies, critics didn’t share enough excitement to make a spy movie that goes backwards worth the possibility of dying of coronavirus. The audiences didn’t show up as much, and those who did attend, mostly complained about the sound mixing and the plot. After all the sacrifice, it’s highly unlikely that Tenet goes beyond technical awards. Let’s start the “Travis Scott for Best Original Song” campaign now, before it’s too late.
-The Boys in the Band (trailer): The Ryan Murphy blank check for Netflix has been interesting to follow. On the one hand, we have his new TV shows, which go from not existing (The Politician), to alternate movie history that doesn’t know how alternate history works (Hollywood), to a challenge of how much TV will you stomach if Sarah Paulson and other middle aged actresses are campy in it (Ratched). And now, we are seeing his producing hand over the movie side, which starts with the new film adaptation of the cult play from 1968, which was already a movie in 1970 and recently jumped to Broadway in 2018. The cast from the recent Broadway production (which includes Jim Parsons, Zachary Quinto, Matt Bomer and Andrew Rannells) stars in Joe Mantello’s movie, telling the story of a group of gay friends in pre-Stonewall New York who reunite for a birthday party and end up revealing a lot of open wounds. While this movie got good reviews from critics, it kinda disappeared without a sound after beginning to stream on Netflix at the end of September. Unless the service wants to campaign for Golden Globes, this film is lost in the algorithm.
-The Devil All the Time (trailer): Another September release on Netflix was the new psychological thriller by Antonio Campos (Simon Killer, Christine) who didn’t manage to continue his streak of intense and terrifying character dramas with his messy adaptation of the dark novel by Donald Ray Pollock. Wasting a cast that includes Tom Holland, Sebastian Stan, Robert Pattinson, Mia Wasikowska, Eliza Scanlen, Bill Skarsgard, Jason Clarke and Riley Keough, this twisted period piece managed to stay for a while in the Top 10, but the reactions from critics were mixed, and audiences were busy asking what was happening with Pattinson’s Southern accent (which with The King makes two years in a row, baby). The many prognosticators who had hopes for an awards play moved on a while ago.
-The Father (trailer): It’s safe to say at this point that Anthony Hopkins is a lock for a Best Actor nomination at the next Oscars. After its premiere in Sundance, every prognosticator pointed in his direction, and for the next few months he swept praise for his harrowing portrayal of an old man grappling with his age as he develops dementia, causing pain to his beleaguered daughter (recent winner Olivia Colman, who also got praised). Sony Pictures Classics will make Florian Zeller’s adaptation of his acclaimed play its big contender of the season, using Hopkins (who this year got a nom for The Two Popes) as a starter to also get Colman, Zeller and the movie nominated.
-The Human Voice (trailer): And speaking of Sony Pictures Classics, it’s almost safe to say that they have another Oscar in the bag this year. That’s because they just bought Pedro Almodóvar’s short film, his English-speaking debut that is an adaptation of the play by Jean Cocteau. In his version (that was acclaimed by critics after premiering in Venice), Tilda Swinton plays the woman waiting at the end of a phone, expecting to hear from his ex-lover who abandoned her. Considering how the competition for Best Live Action Short Film has become somewhat lacking in the last few years (I mean, have you seen Skin), this should be an easy award to win, especially considering how beloved Almodóvar is in the Academy, which nominated him this year for the great Pain and Glory.
-The Life Ahead: While we’re talking about legends, it’s time to talk about Sophia Loren. 16 years after her last leading role in a movie, the Italian icon returns with a drama that was bought by Netflix, who plans to campaign for her as Best Actress and for the movie in the Best International Film category. Directed by Edoardo Ponti (who is also Sophia’s son), this movie centers on a Holocaust survivor who takes in a 12-year-old boy who recently robbed her, in a contemporary adaptation of Romain Gary’s novel The Life Before Us. Netflix has set a date for November 13 to release this movie, and the campaign seems to be about the narrative of seeing Loren winning another Oscar 60 years after she won her first one for Two Women, by Vittorio De Sica.
-The Midnight Sky: Based on the novel Good Morning, Midnight, this collaboration between George Clooney and Netflix is once again making us ask one thing. Are we gonna get the director Clooney of Good Night and Good Luck, or are we gonna get the director Clooney of Leatherheads, The Ides of March, The Monuments Men and Suburbicon? Let’s hope he breaks his streak of blandness with this sci-fi story, which makes us think a little bit of Gravity: A lonely scientist in the Arctic (Clooney) races to stop a group of astronauts led by Felicity Jones from returning to a devastated Earth. With a release set for December, we have to hope that this is more than some Top 10 filler that will evaporate from existence in a week’s time.
-The Prom: In probably the biggest blank check of the Ryan Murphy deal with Netflix, this musical he’ll direct is based on the Tony-nominated show about a group of Broadway losers (Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman, Andrew Rannells and James “boo” Corden) who try to find a viral story to get back in the spotlight, and end up going to a town in Indiana to help a lesbian high school student who has been banned from bringing her girlfriend to the prom. While it’s clear that this December 11 release is gonna sweep the Golden Globes, the emptiness of this year compared to others could clear the way for some Oscar nominations, including Meryl and the obligatory original song added to a preexisting musical for easy clout.
-The Trial of the Chicago 7 (trailer): When it was announced that Paramount was selling Aaron Sorkin’s new movie to Netflix, some people saw it as a studio dumping a failed awards vehicle to be forgotten. However, the excuse that Sorkin wanted to release this movie before the US presidential elections seems to be true, because critics really enjoyed his old school courtroom drama, centered around the trial on counter cultural activists in the late ‘60s. Everybody praised uniformly the huge cast, that includes Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Jeremy Strong, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Frank Langella, William Hurt, Michael Keaton and Mark Rylance, which guarantees a SAG awards nomination (but makes it difficult to decide which actors will actually get nominated for Oscars). With a reaction that brings to mind the days of A Few Good Men and is the best reception he got since his Oscar winning script for The Social Network, the film faces a couple of hurdles. First of all, it got positioned as the frontrunner in the Best Picture race by some people, which instantly puts a target on its back. Then, we have to consider that the movie releases on Netflix this Friday, October 16, which makes it the first big contender this year to face the world, and which in these times of lockdown will probably make the reception to Marriage Story and The Irishman from last year look like a walk in the park. I mean, there are some people who aren’t swayed by Sorkin, and for good reason.
-The United States vs. Billie Holiday: While Paramount was quick to hand The Trial of the Chicago 7 to Netflix, there’s another movie that the studio kept to play in the upcoming awards season. This biographical drama follows the life of another famous musician, Billie Holiday (Andra Day), and we see the journey of her career in jazz as she is targeted by the Federal Department of Narcotics with an undercover sting operation led by Federal Agent Jimmy Fletcher (Trevante Rhodes), with whom she had a tumultuous affair. While the movie counts with a screenplay credit by Pulitzer winner Suzan-Lori Parks, the big question mark is the film’s director, Lee Daniels, who hit it big with Precious and then had results that were disastrous (The Paperboy) or financially successful, but not awards-wise (Lee Daniels’ The Butler). However, Paramount trusts in this movie, and with a release date on February 12, they want to make a splash.
-Wolfwalkers (trailer): While the attempts by Apple TV+ to establish themselves as a player in the TV world go from trainwrecks (See) to forgettable (The Morning Show) to eventually great (see Ted Lasso, everybody, this is not a joke), their plans to make a name in the film business have something to do with this year’s Oscars. While Cherry can come or go, they have a solid contender for the Best Feature Documentary with Boys State, but their big dog this year is the new movie by Cartoon Saloon, an Irish studio responsible for the acclaimed The Secret of Kells, The Song of the Sea, and The Breadwinner, all of which were nominated for Best Animated Feature. This time, Tomm Moore and Ross Stewart direct a story about a young apprentice hunter who journeys with her father to Ireland to help wipe out the last wolf pack. But everything changes when she befriends a free-spirited girl from a mysterious tribe rumored to transform into wolves by night. After getting critically acclaimed following its premiere at TIFF, this is a surefire contender for this year’s Best Animated Feature category, and Apple is gonna parade it before its streaming release on December 11. Also, while you watch that, you could watch a couple of episodes of Ted Lasso, too. It’s a really good show, it’s all I’m saying.
Anyways, that’s all the news from the last few months of festivals. No matter what happens next, this is gonna be a long, long, long race.
submitted by jonisantucho to blankies [link] [comments]


2020.09.18 13:52 nextzero182 I watch a horror movie every day, here's everything I watched in August

(2019) The Lighthouse 9.5/10
The visuals are jaw-dropping; almost every single frame of this film is photographic. The soundtrack is stripped down to just these haunting sounds of fog horns and piss buckets. The package everything is delivered in, from an artistic standpoint, is so memorable. The performances by Pattinson and Dafoe are both some of the best I’ve seen this entire year and really, the decade…possibly of all time. They deliver this brilliant script’s dialogue with such passion, humor and intensity. The story in this film is shrouded in mystery but the clues and tools needed to decipher it do exist and with a re-watch, finding them felt so rewarding.
(2007) Zodiac 9/10
This is one of my favorite Fincher movies and for anyone familiar with his stellar catalogue, that’s a bold claim. It feels so real and lived-in. The cast is absolutely stacked but so complimentary. It’s not the most violent film, it’s much more story driven but the moments of violence feel fucking powerful. The horror in this film isn’t about the serial killer, it’s really about obsession and Gyllenhaal absolutely nails his performance to bring that aspect home. Despite this film’s high praise by critics and regular assholes like myself, it is a slow-burn. It’s long and tedious and that aspect, which I love, could easily turn someone off.
(1981) Raiders of the Lost Ark 9/10
Raiders of the Lost Arc is such an important movie to me. It helped open my eyes to darker content as a child, for better or worse. It also introduced me to one of my favorite characters of all time, Indiana Jones. Harrison Ford doesn’t play a superhero in this movie, he’s very flawed and mortal. Yet, somehow he always seems to prevail, despite dire circumstances. Everything that could ever be said about this film has been said, I’m just here to show my appreciation.
(2014) Spring 8.5/10
This movie is wonderful, raw, natural and intriguing. It’s not over-acted or overthought in any way. It’s fucked up and complicated. This felt like an homage to Possession but the love story aspect really shines through. It feels helpless and hopeful at the same time. Benson’s script is amazing. The influences are impossible not to see but the dialogue is incredibly natural. The reactions are the same. I’ve always said that films shot in idyllic landscapes are a blank canvas for horror. There’s so much beautiful contrast.
(2007) Timecrimes 8.5/10
I loved this movie when I first saw it but upon rewatching it, I can’t help but stress its influence in the time-loop horror sub-genre. Sure films like Primer definitely helped pave the way but Timecrimes really manages to focus less on the science fiction and more on the horrifying consequences that come with time travel. I really enjoyed Karra Elajalde’s performance, his character’s physical and mental degradation throughout the film is really a high point to me. Almost all of these films on paper would seem predictable in concept but Timecrimes is just another one that manages to pull you in despite that. A part of me knew exactly how this was going to play out but a bigger part of me was too engrossed to be sure.
(2018) Gwen 8.5/10
This movie is an atmospheric slow burn down to the T so if that’s a sub-genre you generally don’t enjoy, this isn’t going to be something to change your mind. With that being said, it’s an incredibly heartbreaking story that, while exists in the folk-horror genre, subverts any and all expectations. The characters are real and suffering in this sort of beautiful but also incredibly bleak, barren landscape. Eleanor Worthington-Cox and Maxine Peaks carry the entire film. The story itself, while simple, yet powerful, is unwoven tediously, evoking all sorts of dread. I don’t think- scratch that, I know everyone is not going to like this movie. The plot is way too stripped down for mainstream appeal. If you find yourself empathizing with the characters and become personally involved in the period and setting, it can be an emotional watch.
(2005) Constantine 8.5/10
I was pretty surprised at the semi-mixed reaction to this film before I learned it was a comic book adaptation. Listen, I’ve obviously never even heard about this comic but let me just say, as a standalone movie, it’s fucking awesome. It’s basically Keanu Reeves battling his way through hell, murking demons and basically just being badass as shit. I love the entire cast, Rachel Weisz, Shia LaBeouf, etc. A true standout to me too was Tilda Swinton who plays the vague gendered Gabriel. The special effects, even 15 years later, are still fucking awesome. There’s a ton of CGI which isn’t always my favorite but it’s quality CGI that stands the test of time. I really loved this movie, I’d recommend it to anyone.
(2020) Relic 8/10
Robyn Nevin is fantastic here and all the supporting roles are great but not only does this woman make the movie, she is the movie. Her dialogue, her delivery and her body language, at least to me, are a huge chunk of the entire plot. I just found this movie to be gentle until it isn’t, which makes for the most tense moments. It’s a very claustrophobic film; I think it does justice to a very serious and frightening illness.
(1986) The Little Shop of Horrors 8/10
Okay to keep things real, I’ve never been a big musical dude but this movie is fun as hell. Rick Moranis is as goofy as ever and good god…the practical effects are mind-blowing. You’re watching this giant plant movie and it just melts your brain thinking about how it was accomplished. I had to look it up and after finding out it took sped-up footage, vocal matching with said footage and 60 men to operate this giant…puppet(?), I couldn’t be more impressed.
(2020) Palm Springs 8/10
It doesn’t take long to catch on that, while this is a romantic comedy, it’s also a sci-fi horror film and a specific subset of sci-fi that makes me anxious. So in some regards, at least to genre placement, there’s my bias. The movie is seriously a treat though. It’s a new spin on an old formula and it’s genuinely funny, suspenseful and endearing. Even if you disagree that it shouldn’t be discussed in the horror circles, you won’t regret watching it.
(1979) Nosferatu the Vampire 8/10
This film not only embodies and celebrates the original in terms of structure as well as substance, but in its restrained filmmaking methods; its ability to let shots live without intervention. It’s atmospheric, well-trimmed and just an all-around, exceptional film. Klaus Kinsi as Nosferatu is perfect; I loved the makeup design. His character is so out in the open that the shots have to be perfect in order to avoid the sillier pitfalls of films in the same vein attempting to achieve the same results. It still contains small doses of the eras beloved campiness, which I can appreciate to some degree, as it feels balanced within context. Dracula’s takeover of the town is anything but some violent, typical horror spectacle. Rather, Werner Herzog decides to portray it in a fever-dream-like fashion, elevated by the very minimal but well-used soundtrack.
(2009) The House of the Devil 8/10
Modern horror is no stranger to throwback aesthetics from earlier decades but in 2009, that wasn’t the case. Not only did this movie pioneer that but it did it so successfully. My absolute favorite aspect of this film is the retro feel. It captured 70’s horror so incredibly well. Ti West is a talented filmmaker and this is one of my favorites by him. It’s a slow burn but so sinister and despite many complaining that the payoff wasn’t worth the wait, I have to disagree. Also, the suspense during the build-up was my favorite part. The violence, especially early on, while limited, is so powerful and raw. It really set an uneasy tone for the rest of the runtime.
(1989) Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade 8/10
You know, this movie was the least memorable of the trilogy to me and I think that holds up, to a degree. I like this movie a lot though, fuck it, I love this movie. It’s the least horror focused but still has at least one intense body-horror moment. I don’t think too many people talk about how brave this movie is though; it tackles one of the most divisive topics, religion and does so in such a thrilling fashion. Indy is still Indy here, he’s fucking badass; his character and dialogue excel in this entry immensely. Not just dialogue but this film contains some of the best action choreography of the entire series, something that almost seems unfairly diminished through repetition. This movie is fucking awesome.
(1984) Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom 8/10
This is probably the most influential horror movie of my entire childhood. The first time I watched it I had to shut it off at the heart scene and I think it took a few more tries to even make it through the whole thing. Unlike Scream, watching this decades later didn’t really totally eliminate that. I think it’s a scary movie and a really dark turn in the trilogy. There are quirky aspects of it character wise that are kind of goofy but playful. Overall though, goddamn dude, these set pieces are amazing. I love this movie and I’m totally biased but there are so many iconic moments during it. Harrison Ford is also jacked to shit and just at an all-time fuck-shit-up mode. His greedy and gritty character compliments the plot incredibly well.
(1984) The Terminator 8/10
This movie, simply put, is badass as shit. Everything you could ever need to know about it is established in the very first scene. I’m aware the series kind of progresses into more action focused territory with the sequels but the original will always be a horror movie to me. The pacing, the unstoppable force that is Arnold, it’s all thrilling as shit. Sure, there’s a few instances of 80’s special effects that have aged like milk, mostly with the final scene but for the most part, the effects look dope still. Cameron hasn’t missed in his entire career in my opinion and this film is a benchmark in multi-genre spanning, epic, cinematic movies. I love it.
(2009) The Loved Ones 7.5/10
This is the film that got me into Sean Byrne and it’s really something special. It reminds of almost a modern day interpretation of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, if the dinner scene was the entire film. It’s a non-thinker, fun horror movie in a purest sense. Byrne seems aware of that and the story and pacing all cater to it so well. Robin McLeavy plays one of the most unlikable villains to date and that alone is a ticket for investment in this film. It would seem almost playful to a horror veteran but the sadistic and incestuous nature of her writing is something to behold. This is a popcorn movie but a great one at that.
(1973) The Crazies 7/10
There’s some silly and overly-eccentric characters, per Romero’s usual style but I actually enjoyed this one a lot. I’m not even speaking directly about the remake but this film inspired a lot of modern horror films and concepts. There’s this great scene with this old lady knitting that I just adore. The innocent and violent clash in such an effective way. Obviously the horror aspects in that scene, as well as the virus itself are very fictional. The government response though, seems almost plausible, considering how they’re currently handling Covid-19. The miscommunication within government agencies in this film is both satisfying and frustratingly accurate.
(2019) I Trapped the Devil 7/10
This one is a bit of a slow-burn but I felt the tension from beginning to end so none of it felt like a blind investment. It had the potential to be another, cookie-cutter, pretentious statement but what I found it to be was simply a well-crafted horror film. While this film doesn’t shoot for the moon, it executes a well-trimmed, concise story and I’d fully recommend it to anyone interested in satanic horror.
(1935) The Black Room 7/10
This is another Universal horror film starring Karloff, directed by Roy Neill. It presents itself with the usual, tight-knit flair you may have come to expect but it somehow has seen much less recognition than any of the major monster movies. I really liked this movie. Despite the predictable nature, I found the short run-time to be refreshing and the performances were great. It was also a really cleanly produced. I suspect that’s due to the lack of need for special effects but nevertheless, it’s a high point. Definitely check this one out. It feels warms and slightly gothic; overall, it’s just a very well-executed movie.
(2004) The Day After Tomorrow 6/10
This may be due to the unrealistic science fiction needed to drive these plots, but I can’t decide if Emmerich takes his own work seriously. These films are undoubtedly brilliant visual spectacles at times and pretty goddamn entertaining but also a breeding ground for vapid characters. However, his films also seem to have actual political and social commentary. In the case of this film, it’s the world’s most on-the-nose message about climate change. I’m not even sure how much of a criticism that is but take it for what you will. The intense scenes in this movie are legitimately intense and even watching this 16 years after it was released, the CGI is pretty great. New York city is a fun sandbox for disaster porn and I had a great time watching it.
(2014) The Possession of Michael King 6/10
I was pleasantly surprised by this one. The “Possession of” movies are a mixed bag and despite this one in particular being really low-budget, they did a great job at creating scary visuals. I loved the psychological torment, specifically this idea with flies that’s legitimately creepy as fuck. They take it to a level where I think right at the end it dips off into the ridiculous but not in a way that’s awful, just not to my personal tastes.
(2019) Sweetheart 6/10
Sweetheart is a fairly well-made survival horror film that starts out well but unfortunately fades into mediocrity. While the first half is actually more of a methodical portion of the film, it’s strangely the second act that feels like a chore to watch at times. There’s some talent to look out for here but it seems underdeveloped on this project. With that being said, it’s still really entertaining for the most part, just treat it more as a popcorn movie rather than something to really sink your teeth into.
(2013) Boar 6/10
Yeah I don’t even really know what to say. It’s a killer boar movie. It’s fun, the gore is pretty great and it’s well-paced. I don’t really feel inspired to write a novel about it but it’s worth a watch.
(2014) Digging up the Marrow 6/10
I’m not surprised to hear people complaining about this film because it’s by no means perfect. However, I am surprised to hear so many people targeting Adam Green’s ego as being the shining flaw in this movie. I have no bias towards the guy, I’m a casual fan but I do think that people mistook the meta-aspects of this story to be simply for self-service. With that being said, I like this movie. I don’t love it but the build-up was pretty intense, carried by an always somewhat unhinged Ray Wise. I’m glad they didn’t show a ton right away or really, at all, because it would have been even cheesier. This is a fun movie though that’s really not meant to be taken all that seriously. The creature design is cool and it’s just an easily digestible popcorn flick. I would have re-wrote the ending a bit to be less convoluted and abrupt (paradoxical almost, I know) but I can still recommend this one.
(2015) The Vatican Tapes 6/10
I didn’t have high hopes for this one, exorcism movies are just so oversaturated. With that being said, I was pleasantly surprised. The horror of it all, the culmination or whatever, is exactly what you’d expect and if that seems like a spoiler, it’s more of a statement on the sub-genre itself. It’s the build-up and basically entire first half that impressed me. I truly felt like the events that conspire could happen to anyone. This was by no means a waste of time, despite how many times this story has been done.
(2014) The Last Showing 5.5/10
Robert Englund lends his talents to a b-movie of sorts here but the end product isn’t that bad. Outside of him, the acting isn’t bad either. Chris Geere from You’re the Worst is actually in it and he’s such a hilariously miserable cunt. It entertained me enough but in the end, felt really bland. I’m feeling pretty eh on this one.
(2017) Lost Child 5/10
Lost Child wasn’t quite what I was expecting, which in some ways, was the only thing I enjoyed about it. They keep the mystery going for a long time and to their credit, I was never exactly sure how things were going to play out. Unfortunately, it’s just really boring and there’s no huge payoff. I liked a few of the characters and as far as production and acting goes, it was just fine. It’s kind of one of those mid-movies that doesn’t do a whole lot wrong but also doesn’t do a whole lot right.
(2019) In the Tall Grass 4.5/10
People seem to be pretty divisive about this film to the point where not a lot of middle ground criticism is being offered but that’s where it lands to me. It often engaged me, I like a lot of the sci-fi aspects, felt there were a few good performances and I didn’t hate the conclusion. With that being said, not a single aspect of this movie wow’d me in any fashion. It feels like it actually could have been shortened a bit, as in like an episode of an anthology. I don’t hate it but I don’t love it either.
submitted by nextzero182 to horror [link] [comments]


2020.09.17 19:37 Cephalopodcoming2035 Discussion for Antonio Campos' new film The Devil All the Time on Netflix.

Firstly, want to preface this by saying I've seen most of Campos' filmography before his new Netflix film. This includes Afterschool (2008), Simon Killer (2012), Christine (2016) and the first season of The Sinner (2017). Anyone familiar with Campos' filmography will know that he is a director that likes to tackle characters who are fucked up.
I'd say even though Campos' is relatively unknown, even on the indie circuit, his most known work would have to be Christine, seeing as how Rebecca Hall got some awards traction for her performance as real-life reporter Christine Chubbuck.
Even though Simon Killer is part of the Eureka! Masters of Cinema collection (basically a UK Criterion label), most people see the film as a boring or trite character study of a sociopath, seeing as how the story is very, very simple, and the film borrows a ton of stylistic influences from already established directors like Haneke. Its overall consensus is good at best (seeing that Brady Corbet carries it) and forgettable and un-nuanced at worst. I won't say I share the same opinion as most others but I understand where they come from.
Going from character studies like Christine and Simon Killer to this film, I can already say I miss whatever style Campos' was trying to hone in on. I feel like to really enjoy something from Campos' is to study the central protagonist like he does. Their mannerisms, facial expressions, how they react and converse in different situations, etc. It probably gets boring quick for most people however, which is why he'd likely wanted to adapt a meatier story like Donald Ray Pollack's novel of the same name.
In the novel, there are 5 to 6 stories that all intersect. Willard's struggles after the war; the serial-killer duo; priest Roy and his brother Theodore; Lenora and the pedophile priest Teagardin; and Arvin. To adapt something as extensive as this faithfully would mean either turning it into a mini-series or a lengthy anthology film. As it stands, The Devil All the Time clocks in at 2 and a quarter hours, and honestly, it feels not meaty enough to be a proper anthology, nor does it feel tight and structured enough to be about one central protagonist. (Tom Holland, who gets top billing, is probably in a quarter of the film.) Campos' has always drawn out scenes with his characters, and often in one long take too, so seeing scenes edited and cut like this seem so jarring for someone like him.
In fact, I don't know whether to blame Netflix because they wanted the film to be shorter and more marketable, or to blame Campos because his adapted screenplay might have already been this messy to begin with, or even to blame his editor.
There are quite a few scenes in the film that seem to have shaved beginning and end shots. There's also smash cuts to previous scenes to give re-incorporation that was seriously unneeded, but was probably done on Netflix's part so I won't blame Campos for it. The scene with Willard's letter was probably the worst out of this, because it broke the film's actual timeline and left me confused for a good minute.
The scene with the black-and-white photograph montage also went on far too long for me, and probably solidified that 18 rating from the BBFC. Seriously, I think it took a full minute when it could've been 10 seconds.
If we're talking editing in general, at the end of a conversation, a character will say something to another character with a lot of weight and you expect to see their reaction, but you're already rushed to the next scene. A characters' death which is supposed to hold a lot of emotion is often relegated to one shot of the family members in a wide shot standing in a graveyard. There's no scenes where characters mourn and breakdown (with one exception), which is also why this film has next to no awards contention for its actors.
Speaking of characters, the cast here and their performances are a very, very mixed bag.
Tom Holland's given good material to work with, and his accent's mostly convincing, but I feel like he really should've been given a scene where he mourned over Eliza Scanlen's death. I did not buy his love for her, nor his final confrontation with Sebastian Stan's character, where his shocked face was just bugged-out eyes.
Bill Skarsgård's accent was all over the place, and the scene with him and his son at the prayer log was obviously cut around his performance because he was trying too hard to shed tears. (Honestly, Michael Banks Repeta's performance as young Arvin is the BEST performance in the film, exceeding Holland's. There were a couple scenes where they showed his pale, spiritless complexion and I completely bought it and felt for him.)
Riley Keough was quite good showing a nuanced and even somewhat empathetic accomplice, although too much of the novel was cut to make me buy her character's motivations in the film.
Jason Clarke was convincingly creepy, and his accent, as always, is the most convincing out of the cast.
Sebastian Stan was just fine, but frankly he was as wooden as the prayer log in the book. (I chuckled seeing him standing in the doorway about to shoot Tater Brown in his fatsuit.) In the scene where he discovers his sister has not only been an accomplice to several murders, but has probably had intercourse with their victims before and after their deaths, and shown-off with them in states of undress on camera, I'd expected his face to morph into something horrifying. But instead all I got was ಠ_ಠ
Harry Melling's performance was good, but his attempt at an accent was all over the place and ruined it for me. Pokey LaFarge as his dim-witted brother did a better job frankly.
Haley Bennett actually looked like a character that came from a backwoods town on the Bible belt in the 50s, and her performance and makeup really sold it. She didnt just seem like a pretty face on the cast listing. (I'd say the same for Clarke as well but he's already a serial killer so...)
Eliza Scanlen was really great, but just missed the mark for me seeing as she's the character that goes through the most pain and trauma in the film, and yet her complexion is always somewhat fair.
Mia Wasikowska, for her little screen time, was believable.
And then there's Robert fuckin Pattinson. He plays a new priest in the town of Knockemstiff, and is shown to commit pedophilic acts in the film. You'd expect a character like his to have a commanding presence in his voice, especially in his sermons, or sexy and alluring when he's enticing girls, but throughout the entire film, he puts on this squirrelly inflection that makes him seem like such a wuss. I did not buy him AT ALL, neither as a country priest, nor as a pedophile. This may have been a choice on his part, maybe to show the character's inner cowardice, but it could have been revealed in the final confrontation between him and Holland's character. I have no clue how I'm supposed to find him convincing when he gave his sermons. I even burst out laughing when he squeaked his voice at Holland before he got shot. Didn't help that his accent was the most inconsistent (other than Melling's) either. I'd say he's giving Eddie Redmayne's performance in Jupiter Ascending a run for its money.
I don't like giving comparisons between novels and their adaptations, but I honestly thought the characters in the film could have benefit from looking a lot more filthy like how they seemed in the book. The production and set design really sold it, with all the rusted vehicles and dilapidated houses. But their makeup was far too clean, and I was always distracted seeing how un-greased the male characters had their hair. Robert Pattinson, in particular, looked like he had the money and time to spend 2 hours in makeup. I bought it with his scene featuring his inauguration into the small church, but every scene after that he maintains an extremely clean complexion which was really distracting.
I'd say the cinematography was servicable, but compared to Simon Killer and Christine, and even Afterschool (where Campos basically copied off Haneke), it was probably the most forgettable. If you showed me shots of this and 10 other Netflix original period crime dramas I wouldn't have been able to tell you the difference, other than maybe the film grain. There were a couple standouts though. Alot of shots trailing cars were very stylish (especially the one at dusk); the scene where Arvin is told Lenora was pregnant when she committed suicide is shot beautifully against a sunset-lit backdrop; the interior car scenes with the two serial killers were very memorably shot. However, in the scene where Arvin and Sheriff Bodecker standoff, and Bodecker gets shot and collapses, the lighting on his face was so artificial and inconsistent from the wide shots it looked like it was from a bad 80s genre film with a shoestring budget.
The main theme by Bensi and Juriaans, for what is worth, is fine. It served the film, but I didn't think it was all that great in the end.
Overall, if I had to number a rating, I'd probably give it a 4 or a 5. Which is really depressing seeing as how I've liked his prior stuff, even including the first season of The Sinner.
Before ending, I'd like to say I noticed Campos didn't serve as executive producer for this film, unlike all his others. He co-founded Borderline Films with filmmakers Sean Durkin and Josh Mond. If they sound familiar its because Durkin did Martha Marcy May Marlene (2011) and The Nest (2020), and Josh Mond did James White (2015), which was high up on Adam's 2015 list. They've also produced Nicolas Pesce's films The Eyes of My Mother (2015) and Piercing (2018). Most, if not all, of these films are character studies of fucked up people, including Campos'. So my biggest question is, why wouldn't he serve as executive producer on The Devil All the Time?
I'd like to know what everyone else here thought too. If you liked (or even loved) this film please share :)
submitted by Cephalopodcoming2035 to YMS [link] [comments]


2020.08.20 09:17 Deathly_rYaN DCFANDOME: HALL OF HEROES Event Schedule - This Saturday August 22nd, 2020

DC Fandome is on the way, for all you DC Fans! This Saturday at 1:25PMEST (10.25AM PDT/6.25PM BST), WB Montreal will be revealing their game off rumored to be the next Batman game featuring the Bat Family.
You can check out the full schedule for the event over at DC Fandome.
submitted by Deathly_rYaN to DC_GothamKnights [link] [comments]


2020.07.24 22:12 lovey24Jul The Beach Se-x Scen-e

The Beach Se-x Scen-e
Watch it Here >>>>>>>>>> 🔴►🔴► Play
Sharp Objects Sex Scene Song Ji Hyo Sex Scene Team America World Police Sex Scene Teeth Sex Scene Teresa Palmer Sex Scene Teresa Ruiz Sex Scene Thandie Newton Sex Scene The Beach Sex Scene The Idiots Sex Scene The Interview Sex Scene The Rock Sex Scene Threesome Sex Scene Top Gun Sex Scene Uncensored Sex Scenes Unsimulated Sex Scenes in Movies Wedding Crashers Sex Scene Witcher 2 Sex Scenes Yellowstone Sex Scene Zanes Sex Chronicles Sex Scenes Zooey Deschanel Sex Scene 13 Reasons Why Season 2 Sex Scenes A Haunted House Sex Scene Amanda Cerny Sex Scene Angela Bassett Sex Scene Animated Sex Scenes Anime With Sex Scene Anna Camp Sex Scene Anne Winters Sex Scene Anon Sex Scene Arrow Sex Scene Arya Sex Scene Pornhub Asia Argento Sex Scene Belly Sex Scene Best Movie Sex Scenes Porn Best Sex Scene 2018 Best Sex Scenes in Shameless Best Tv Show Sex Scenes Billie Piper Sex Scene Blade Runner Sex Scene Bloodrayne Sex Scene Bo Derek Sex Scene Boku No Pico Sex Scene Border Sex Scene Borgia Sex Scene Boss Sex Scene Bradley Cooper Sex Scene Bridgette Wilson Sex Scene Brittany Snow Sex Scene Cabin in the Woods Sex Scene Caddyshack Sex Scene Celebrity Explicit Sex Scenes Celebrity Sex Scene Porn Charlie Hunnam Sex Scene Chloe Moretz Sex Scene Chris Hemsworth Sex Scene Christian Serratos Sex Scene Christina Ricci Sex Scene Chucky Sex Scene Claire Danes Sex Scene Color of Night Sex Scene Colton Haynes Sex Scene Crank 2 Sex Scene Daniel Radcliffe Gay Sex Scene Danielle Harris Sex Scene Danielle Panabaker Sex Scene Dianna Agron Sex Scene Dina Shihabi Sex Scene Disclosure Sex Scene Dwayne Johnson Sex Scene Easy Sex Scenes Eating Out Sex Scene Ebony Sex Scene Elisabeth Shue Sex Scene Enter the Void Sex Scene Episode Sex Scene Eurotrip Sex Scene Ex Machina Sex Scene Far Cry Sex Scene Fish Tank Sex Scene Freddy Vs Jason Sex Scene Frida Sex Scene Ghost Sex Scene God of War 3 Sex Scene God of War 4 Sex Scene Good Girls Sex Scene Good Sex Scenes Greys Anatomy Sex Scenes Gypsy Sex Scene Halloween 2007 Sex Scene Harlots Sex Scenes Hayden Panettiere Sex Scene Her Sex Scene Hot Sex Movie Scene Hot Sex Scene Porn Hottest Tv Sex Scenes How Are Sex Scenes Filmed Intense Sex Scenes Jake Gyllenhaal Sex Scene James Bond Sex Scene James Franco Sex Scene Jamie Chung Sex Scene January Jones Sex Scene Jarhead Sex Scene Jason Statham Sex Scene Jennifer Carpenter Sex Scene Judy Greer Sex Scene Julia Louis Dreyfus Sex Scene Julia Stiles Sex Scene Jungle Fever Sex Scene Katheryn Winnick Sex Scene Katie Cassidy Sex Scene Kaya Scodelario Sex Scene Kelly Reilly Sex Scene Krista Allen Sex Scene Laura Dern Sex Scene Liana Mendoza Sex Scene Lili Simmons Sex Scene Little Children Sex Scene Love and Basketball Sex Scene Maggie Siff Sex Scene Magic Mike Sex Scene Manga Sex Scene Masters of Sex Scenes Moonlight Sex Scene Movie Sex Scene Compilation Movie Sex Scenes That Were Real Movies on Netflix With Sex Scenes Mr and Mrs Smith Sex Scene Natalie Martinez Sex Scene New Sex Scenes Noomi Rapace Sex Scene Nurse Jackie Sex Scene Office Sex Scene Orange is the New Black All Sex Scenes Penny Dreadful Sex Scenes Pool Sex Scene Showgirls Porkys Sex Scene Predator 2 Sex Scene Pretty Woman Sex Scene Revenge of the Nerds Sex Scene Rhona Mitra Sex Scene Risky Business Sex Scene Rosie Perez Sex Scene Rough Movie Sex Scenes Ryan Reynolds Sex Scene Sally4ever Sex Scene Sansa Stark Sex Scene Sarah Jessica Parker Sex Scene Sarah Paulson Sex Scene Scary Movie 2 Sex Scene Secret Diary of a Call Girl Sex Scenes Sex Scene Compilation Sex Scenes From Power Sex Scenes in Orange is the New Black Sex Scenes That Were Real Sexy Movie Sex Scenes Shameless Best Sex Scenes Shameless Season 9 Sex Scene Shay Mitchell Sex Scene Showgirls Pool Sex Scene Sliver Sex Scene Snakes on a Plane Sex Scene Sophia Bush Sex Scene Spartacus Best Sex Scenes Starship Troopers Sex Scene Sunny Leone Sex Scene Supernatural Sex Scenes Survival Island Sex Scene Susan Sarandon Sex Scene Swimfan Sex Scene Taboo Sex Scene Taking Lives Sex Scene Teen Movie Sex Scene Teen Wolf Sex Scene The Chi Sex Scene The Oa Sex Scene The Reader Sex Scene The Spectacular Now Sex Scene The to Do List Sex Scene The Untamed Sex Scene Tiffany Haddish Sex Scene Towelhead Sex Scene Tulip Fever Sex Scene Tumblr Movie Sex Scenes Underworld Sex Scene Wanderlust Sex Scenes Wild Sex Scene Winona Ryder Sex Scene Wolfenstein Sex Scene You Re the Worst Sex Scene Zane Sex Scene Zazie Beetz Sex Scene 12 Years a Slave Sex Scene Adrianne Palicki Sex Scene Afro Samurai Sex Scene Alicia Silverstone Sex Scene Anal Sex Scenes in Movies Annabelle Wallis Sex Scene Another Gay Movie Sex Scenes Ariana Grande Sex Scene Arya Stark Sex Scene Pornhub Ashton Kutcher Sex Scene Beautiful Sex Scene Best Hbo Sex Scenes Best Horror Movie Sex Scenes Best Nude Sex Scenes Bobby Brown Sex Scene Body Heat Sex Scene Body of Evidence Sex Scene Booty Calls All Sex Scenes Brad Pitt Sex Scene Brittany Murphy Sex Scene Brooke Shields Sex Scene Camila Mendes Sex Scene Carmen Electra Sex Scene Catherine Zeta Jones Sex Scene Celebrity Forced Sex Scenes Celebrity Gay Sex Scenes Celebrity Sex Scenes Tumblr Chinese Movie Sex Scene Choices Sex Scenes Christina Applegate Sex Scene Co Ed Confidential Sex Scenes Crimson Peak Sex Scene Cult of Chucky Sex Scene Cynthia Nixon Sex Scene Daniel Radcliffe Sex Scene Dead Calm Sex Scene Detroit Become Human Sex Scene Diego Luna Sex Scene Diora Baird Sex Scene Drive Angry Sex Scene Elisabeth Moss Sex Scene Eliza Dushku Sex Scene Elizabeth Berkley Sex Scene Elizabeth Gillies Sex Scene Elle Fanning Sex Scene Eva Longoria Sex Scene Famke Janssen Sex Scene Far Cry 5 Sex Scene Felicity Jones Sex Scene Fight Club Sex Scene Forrest Gump Sex Scene Free Movie Sex Scenes French Movie Sex Scene Friends Sex Scene Future Man Sex Scene Game of Thrones Gay Sex Scenes Game of Thrones Sex Scenes Compilation Game of Thrones Sex Scenes Videos Get Hard Sex Scene Girls Hbo Sex Scenes Godfather Sex Scene Hannah Baker Sex Scene Happy Time Murders Sex Scene Hardcore Movie Sex Scenes Harley Quinn Sex Scene Haunted House Sex Scene Hbo Girls Sex Scenes Hellraiser Sex Scene Hemlock Grove Sex Scenes Hentai Sex Scene Highschool of the Dead Sex Scene Hilary Duff Sex Scene Hollywood Hot Sex Scenes Hollywood Real Sex Scene Horror Sex Scene Hostel Sex Scene Hottest Lesbian Sex Scenes How Do Actors Do Sex Scenes How to Get Away With Murder Sex Scenes In the Cut Sex Scene In the Realm of the Senses Sex Scene Iron Fist Sex Scene Iron Man Sex Scene Jada Pinkett Smith Sex Scene Japanese Movie Sex Scene Jax Teller Sex Scenes Jay Ellis Sex Scene Jenny Mccarthy Sex Scene Jersey Shore Sex Scenes Jodie Foster Sex Scene John Krasinski Sex Scene Jonathan Groff Sex Scene Julie Benz Sex Scene Juno Sex Scene Juno Temple Sex Scene Karrueche Tran Sex Scene Kate Hudson Sex Scene Katey Sagal Sex Scene Kathryn Hahn Sex Scene Katie Holmes Sex Scene Katrina Law Sex Scene Kelly Rohrbach Sex Scene Kids 1995 Sex Scene Kim Dickens Sex Scene Knocked Up Sex Scene Kristin Davis Sex Scene Lana Tailor Sex Scene Lena Dunham Sex Scene Leslie Bibb Sex Scene Levy Tran Sex Scene Limitless Sex Scene Maisie Williams Sex Scene Game of Thrones Malena Sex Scene Margot Robbie Wolf of Wall Street Sex Scene Maria Bello Sex Scene Martha Higareda Sex Scene Meg Ryan Sex Scene Melisandre Sex Scene Mgk Sex Scene Michelle Rodriguez Sex Scene Milla Jovovich Sex Scene Mindhunter Sex Scene Mindy Kaling Sex Scene Monster Sex Scene Monsters Ball Sex Scene Real Most Graphic Sex Scenes Mother Sex Scene Movie Sex Scenes Xvideos My Bloody Valentine Sex Scene My Days of Mercy Sex Scene Nathalie Emmanuel Sex Scene Neve Campbell Sex Scene Nick Cannon Sex Scene Nobodys Fool Sex Scene Nude Movie Sex Scenes Nymphomaniac Movie Sex Scenes Omari Hardwick Sex Scene Pam Grier Sex Scene Patricia Arquette Sex Scene Polar Movie Sex Scene Pool Sex Scene Pregnant Sex Scene Quest for Fire Sex Scene Rachel Bilson Sex Scene Realistic Sex Scenes Rescue Me Sex Scenes Rihanna Sex Scene Road House Sex Scene Robert Pattinson Sex Scene Rose Leslie Sex Scene Rough Night Sex Scene Saoirse Ronan Sex Scene Sarah Hyland Sex Scene Schindler's List Sex Scene Seduction Sex Scene Set It Off Sex Scene Sex and Lucia Sex Scenes Sex and the City Scenes Sex Education Netflix Nude Scenes Sex Scene 2018 Sex Scene Korean Sex Scenes in Anime Shame Movie Sex Scene Shannon Elizabeth Sex Scene Shanola Hampton Sex Scene Simone Missick Sex Scene Spread Sex Scenes Stella Maeve Sex Scene Stephen King It Sex Scene Straight Outta Compton Sex Scene Suicide Squad Sex Scene Sword Art Online Sex Scene Tanyas Island Sex Scene Tara Reid Sex Scene The Canyons Sex Scene The Crown Sex Scene The Lover Sex Scene The Miseducation of Cameron Post Sex Scene The Office Sex Scene The Pacific Sex Scene Tia Carrere Sex Scene Tidelands Sex Scenes Tom Cruise Sex Scene Top 10 Movie Sex Scenes Top 10 Sex Scenes Uma Thurman Sex Scene Vampire Sex Scene Van Wilder Sex Scene Wanted Sex Scene Wentworth Sex Scenes White Famous Sex Scene Witcher 3 All Sex Scenes Wolf on Wall Street Sex Scene Written Sex Scenes Zulay Henao Sex Scene 40 Year Old Virgin Sex Scene Addison Timlin Sex Scene Aimee Garcia Sex Scene Alexandra Breckenridge Sex Scene All About Anna Sex Scene Amanda Peet Sex Scene Amazing Sex Scene American Sex Scene Ana De La Reguera Sex Scene Anatomy of a Sex Scene Angela White Angie Everhart Sex Scene Anime Sex Scenes Com Anna Nicole Smith Sex Scene



https://preview.redd.it/p6im1e9m4vc51.jpg?width=259&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=b6691142d1d1376050fd05533646c2d802747455
submitted by lovey24Jul to u/lovey24Jul [link] [comments]


2020.07.24 19:04 Ichbinian Text of Le Monde article on Christopher Nolan here (in French).

Lifted from France:
Sur les plateaux de tournage, que ce soit sur un glacier en Islande ou au bord de la mer en Italie en plein été, Christopher Nolan ne se sépare jamais de sa tasse de thé. Elle est comme collée à sa main, toujours à sa disposition. Avec le temps, sans doute en quittant son Angleterre natale pour s’installer aux Etats-Unis dans les années 1990, la tasse s’est transformée en un mug plus facilement transportable.
Le cinéaste américain Samuel Fuller dirigeait ses plateaux avec un pistolet à la main, Nolan le fait en dégustant son thé. D’ailleurs, la seule aspérité sur son visage de collégien modèle, au teint diaphane et à la mèche impeccablement couchée sur le côté, serait ces légères marques brunes sur les dents, résultat de son goût prononcé pour la théine.
« Il a toujours un sachet de thé dans sa poche, remarque l’acteur britannique Michael Caine, qui a travaillé sur tous les films de Nolan depuis Batman Begins [2005] jusqu’au nouveau, Tenet, soit huit longs-métrages. Il peut faire une chaleur d’enfer, il portera toujours sur lui un imperméable avec une poche suffisamment grande pour transporter ses sachets de thé. Et vous le voyez tranquillement siroter sous vos yeux toute la journée. Je me suis dit un jour qu’il devait avoir dans sa poche quelque chose de plus engageant. » L’acteur s’est risqué à demander au réalisateur d’Inception (2010) s’il n’y avait pas un peu de vodka planquée dans la doublure. « Non, a répondu Nolan. Du thé. Rien d’autre. »
Le seul capable de ramener le grand public au cinéma
Si la sobriété est l’un des traits structurants du réalisateur de 49 ans, il en va très différemment de ses films. La folie des projets de Christopher Nolan s’accompagne en plus avec Tenet et ses 200 millions de dollars (172 millions d’euros) de budget d’une attente démesurée. Dans un été déserté par les productions hollywoodiennes, pour la plupart ajournées à 2021, le film tient un rôle messianique. Il est considéré par de nombreux observateurs comme le seul pilier capable de maintenir d’équerre l’édifice des salles obscures, durement frappées par le Covid-19, en ramenant le grand public au cinéma.
Nolan sait la responsabilité qui lui incombe. Le 20 mars, le cinéaste publiait une tribune dans The Washington Post où il demandait au gouvernement américain de venir au secours des exploitants. Le metteur en scène insistait aussi sur l’expérience unique procurée par la salle, « le rôle essentiel qu’elle tient dans notre vie sociale ».
D’abord annoncée au 17 juillet, la sortie du film a été repoussée au 31 juillet puis au 12 août. Avant que Warner Bros ne décide en catastrophe d’un nouveau report sine die, précisant que les dates aux Etats-Unis et dans le reste du monde pourraient ne pas être identiques.
Car programmer, en pleine pandémie, une production aussi onéreuse que Tenet, alors que les cinémas demeurent fermés dans de nombreux Etats américains, y compris en Californie, est une proposition aussi peu raisonnable que les scénarios de Nolan. Autre difficulté : en Chine, seuls les films de moins de deux heures sont éligibles pour la réouverture des salles. Tenet durerait, lui, deux heures trente.
Pour patienter, les spectateurs français pourront se consoler avec la ressortie sur grand écran le 29 juillet d’Inception. Un thriller qui rappelle à quel point les films de Christopher Nolan défient le sens commun. Inception met en scène une équipe d’espions qui infiltrent le subconscient de leurs victimes pour s’installer dans cette zone grise où le rêve se mêle à la réalité. Dans Interstellar (2014), un astronaute envoyé dans une autre galaxie afin de trouver une planète habitable transmet à sa fille, depuis le futur, les informations quantiques lui permettant de maîtriser la force de gravitation afin d’évacuer l’ensemble des Terriens vers un trou de ver à proximité de Saturne.
Une obsession du temps
Lorsque le cinéaste s’attaque à la reconstitution historique avec Dunkerque (2017), relatant le rembarquement, en mai 1940, des troupes britanniques coincées dans la poche de Dunkerque, à la fin de la campagne de France, c’est pour manier une autre de ses obsessions, la flexibilité du temps, entrecroisant les destins de trois soldats qui se jouent sur l’espace d’une heure, d’une journée et d’une semaine.
Même lorsqu’il s’essaie à la forme plus conventionnelle du film de super-héros, avec sa trilogie Batman Begins, The Dark Knight (2008) et The Dark Knight Rises (2012), c’est pour faire du justicier en cape un héros post 11-Septembre qui lutte contre le terrorisme alors que sa légitimité et son pouvoir sont remis en question.
Dans le cinéma américain, Nolan est un cas unique. Le seul à récolter les budgets les plus élevés auprès des studios (de 100 millions à 150 millions de dollars pour Dunkerque, plus de 200 millions pour Tenet), tout en concevant les scénarios les plus cérébraux et les plus audacieux. Et lui, le métaphysicien d’Hollywood, celui qui fait de la physique quantique la matière même de ses fictions, à rebours de toute ficelle facile, séduit le public, le convainc d’adhérer à des expériences narratives qu’il ne tolérerait chez aucun autre réalisateur.
Il y a des raisons objectives à cela. Au Nolan avant-gardiste se superpose un Nolan hédoniste, fasciné par les films de James Bond, leur esthétique de globe-trotteur de haut vol, leur univers en papier glacé traversé de créatures blondes sculpturales, de demeures somptueuses et de navires de plaisance rutilants. « LA NASA VIENT D’ANNONCER QU’ON A PEUT-ÊTRE TROUVÉ UN UNIVERS PARALLÈLE OÙ LE TEMPS S’ÉCOULE À L’ENVERS. D’OÙ MA QUESTION : QUE SE PASSERAIT-IL S’IL DEVENAIT POSSIBLE DE CHANGER LA DIRECTION DU TEMPS ? » CHRISTOPHER NOLAN
Ce décor est celui de Tenet. Dans le nouveau long-métrage de Nolan, un agent secret, incarné par John David Washington, est chargé d’épargner à la planète une menace plus tragique qu’un affrontement nucléaire, « une guerre froide, précise le réalisateur, mais une guerre si froide qu’il devient à peine licite de l’évoquer, tant elle doit demeurer secrète ».
Nolan avait tourné Inception au Japon, à Paris, au Maroc, en Californie, au Royaume-Uni et au Canada. Pour Tenet, il s’est rendu en Inde, en Italie, en Norvège, au Danemark, en Estonie et en Angleterre.
Et le paradoxe Nolan de se confirmer. Tenet est une œuvre hautement personnelle, complexe, où l’auteur matérialise une de ses réflexions personnelles, celle du temps. Quand il l’évoque, il affiche un air encore plus assuré. Une forme de fierté qui l’anime. Le soulagement d’avoir fixé pour de bon une idée obsédante. Dans le film, à l’occasion d’un exercice de tir, une balle semble rebondir sur son point d’impact pour retourner dans le canon de l’arme.
Quelques scènes plus tard, un immense cargo avance alors que les vagues semblent se rétracter, naviguant pour ainsi dire en arrière dans le temps, tandis qu’une poursuite en voiture, dans laquelle se trouve impliqué le personnage principal, se conclut par un véhicule accidenté retournant à son état initial. « Que s’est-il passé ? », demande un mystérieux agent double incarné par Robert Pattinson à John David Washington. « Rien, répond ce dernier, les choses ne se sont pas encore vraiment produites. »
Une mémoire exceptionnelle
Le titre du film, Tenet, est un palindrome, il peut se lire indifféremment de droite à gauche ou de gauche à droite. En physique, la notion d’inversion, et, avec elle, l’idée que les lois de la physique seraient réversibles et symétriques, fascine Nolan.
« Je vais tenter d’expliquer les choses de la manière la plus lisible possible. Il est théoriquement tout à fait possible d’inverser la courbe du temps. Selon des principes classiques, le temps s’écoule de manière unidirectionnelle : il y a le passé, le présent et l’avenir, avec une flèche du temps allant dans cet ordre. Mais, à une échelle quantique, il se révèle tout à fait possible d’inverser cet ordre, d’aller du futur vers le passé. La NASA vient d’annoncer qu’on a peut-être trouvé un univers parallèle où le temps s’écoule à l’envers. D’où ma question : que se passerait-il s’il devenait possible de changer la direction du temps ? L’idée de Tenet est que le temps puisse tout à fait emprunter des directions différentes. » La délinéarisation du temps reste le trait distinctif du cinéma de Nolan.
Et le film sur lequel ce dernier revient inévitablement, comme si tout partait de là, reste son deuxième, Memento (2000), où le temps s’écoule à reculons. L’ordre de ses scènes avait été inversé, mais jamais l’action à l’intérieur de celles-ci. Le personnage principal, Leonard Shelby, un inspecteur de police souffrant d’amnésie à la suite d’un traumatisme crânien, perd sa capacité à utiliser sa mémoire à court terme, au point de devoir tout noter et de tatouer sur son corps les informations capitales lui permettant de retrouver la trace du meurtrier de sa femme.
De tous les personnages imaginés par Nolan, Leonard Shelby apparaît comme le plus proche de lui-même, et pas seulement parce que ce dernier, en parfaite harmonie avec la logique inversée de son film si singulier, a depuis longtemps pris l’habitude de lire les journaux de droite à gauche, commençant systématiquement par la dernière page. Mais à l’effondrement de la mémoire du protagoniste de Memento répond l’hypermnésie de son créateur. L’épouse de Nolan et également productrice de ses films, Emma Thomas, avait d’emblée été frappée par l’étrange mode de fonctionnement du cerveau de son mari.
« Une idée chez lui ne s’exprime que s’il trouve un cadre pour la raconter, constate-t-elle. C’était ainsi le cas pour Inception et Interstellar. Avec Tenet, ce fut encore plus douloureux, dix ans peut-être, cela relevait de l’idée fixe. Mais, une fois son scénario écrit, il a pour ainsi dire son film en tête, à l’image près. Quand il passe dans la salle de montage, c’est encore plus impressionnant. Il garde une trace intacte de chaque prise pour la moindre scène. S’il faut faire la différence entre trente prises, il y parviendra avec une facilité déconcertante. » L’ordre et la rigueur
Christopher Nolan a besoin d’une routine éprouvée pour gérer sa mémoire. Il range systématiquement ses clés dans la même poche. Et prend soin de noter consciencieusement ses idées sur un calepin. Sa tenue vestimentaire de rigueur – un costume trois-pièces, une chemise blanche ou bleu pâle, toujours sans cravate –, portée indifféremment toute l’année, qu’il vente ou qu’il pleuve, s’inscrit dans ce minutieux train-train.
Pour laisser vagabonder son esprit avec la plus grande liberté, Nolan s’est efforcé d’automatiser les tâches matérielles et les aspects les plus fondamentaux de sa vie, à la manière d’une équation de taille qui, une fois résolue, ne nécessite plus d’être revue.
L’ordre et la rigueur règnent dans son monde. Et, en période d’épidémie, c’est très scrupuleusement que le réalisateur respecte les règles sanitaires d’usage. L’entretien se fait à distance et les autoportraits sont réalisés avec l’aide de son fils Oliver afin d’éviter le contact avec un photographe.
Le réalisateur a rencontré à 19 ans son épouse, la future mère de ses quatre enfants, alors qu’ils partageaient les bancs de l’université à Londres. Il s’entoure des mêmes collaborateurs, les directeurs de la photo Wally Pfister puis Hoyte van Hoytema, le monteur Lee Smith, le directeur artistique Nathan Crowley, son frère et scénariste Jonathan Nolan.
Le metteur en scène travaille également pour le même studio, Warner, depuis Insomnia (2002). En fait, le gigantisme de ses productions, l’entreprise titanesque pour les mener à bien, ne relève du possible qu’après avoir bâti un écosystème verrouillé où chacun est à sa place. Intégrer ce phalanstère ne devient envisageable qu’après un strict examen de passage. Un héritage des débuts de Nolan où, sur le plateau de Following (1998), un film tourné les week-ends avec une équipe réduite, il s’occupait d’absolument tout, de la direction de la photo à la direction artistique, jusqu’au menu des déjeuners et à la gestion du ménage à la fin de la journée. Secret-défense
Sur un plateau, Christopher Nolan possède une idée précise de ce que constitue chaque poste de travail. « Je ne suis jamais allé dans une école de cinéma », précise-t-il. Avant d’ajouter : « Comme Stanley Kubrick. » Le seul point commun avec son maître absolu qu’il s’autorise à revendiquer. Intégrer la garde rapprochée de Nolan, un peu à l’image de celle de Stanley Kubrick, passe par un rigoureux bilan de compétences. Il s’agit aussi, à côté de l’indispensable bagage technique et créatif, de faire vœu de silence.
Travailler à ses côtés exige un goût assumé de la confidentialité, en particulier concernant les intrigues de ses films. Avoir accès à des extraits de Tenet pour préparer un entretien avec son réalisateur relève du secret-défense : ceux-ci sont accessibles sur un site sécurisé, avec un code d’accès, pendant une heure avant de s’autodétruire. Comme dans le générique de chaque épisode de Mission impossible.
Michael Caine a fait la connaissance de Christopher Nolan sur le pas de sa porte. L’acteur vétéran britannique, l’une des figures masculines – avec Sean Connery, Albert Finney et Richard Burton – du renouveau du cinéma anglais dans les années 1960, l’avait confondu avec un coursier, tant la démarche – frapper à l’improviste à la porte d’un de ses futurs comédiens – était inhabituelle.
« Je m’appelle Christopher Nolan, j’ai en ma possession un scénario pour vous », avait-il déclaré. Le cinéaste tenait à ce que Caine incarne le majordome de Bruce Wayne dans Batman Begins. Le comédien assure au metteur en scène qu’il prendra le temps de lire le scénario rapidement, mais Nolan, dans l’impossibilité de le laisser circuler, lui demande de le consulter immédiatement. Il s’est alors installé dans le salon, a avalé plusieurs tasses de thé puis, après avoir obtenu le quitus de son acteur, est reparti avec son scénario sous le bras.
L’analogique dans le sang
De Kubrick, Nolan retient un film au-dessus des autres : 2001 : l’Odyssée de l’espace. Il l’a découvert enfant, en a assuré la restauration en 2018. Il y avait ici une démarche altruiste mais aussi mystique. Comme si s’emparer de 2001, en nettoyer le moindre photogramme, permettait enfin à ce réalisateur autodidacte d’accéder aux secrets d’une œuvre dont il n’arrive pas à épuiser la richesse. Car son obsession du temps, il l’éprouve dans son goût revendiqué pour la pellicule.
Quand la quasi-intégralité des réalisateurs hollywoodiens travaille avec le numérique, explorant les possibilités de l’imagerie technologique, et tourne sur fond vert, Nolan est l’un des seuls à résister, membre d’un dernier carré de fidèles avec Steven Spielberg et Quentin Tarantino. « Ce n’est pas uniquement une question de fétichisme, l’analogique se rapproche de ce que voit mon œil. Or je tiens à restituer à l’écran ce que j’ai vu. »
Mais il y a surtout un aspect tactile dans le 35 mm, essentiel aux yeux de Nolan : la pellicule reste concrète. Le cinéaste peut la prendre dans ses mains, inspecter avec ses yeux chaque photogramme, obtenir la sensation du temps qui passe, d’une action qui est, qui ne sera plus, mais dont le mouvement a été fixé pour l’éternité. Ou, à l’opposé, il regarde cette pellicule à l’envers, remonte le cours d’une histoire.
« La caméra vous laisse voir le temps, ce n’était pas possible auparavant dans les autres formes d’expression artistique. C’est pour ça que je m’efforce tant de trouver des histoires ne pouvant être racontées qu’au cinéma », explique le réalisateur. Physique quantique et mélancolique
Quand il triture la pellicule, Nolan concilie les deux grandes affaires qui ont façonné sa personnalité, et donc son travail : le goût de l’abstraction et le besoin de raconter des histoires. Très jeune, sans doute influencé par les films de science-fiction, il s’était pris de passion pour la physique et avait été frappé par les biais narratifs sur lesquels s’appuyaient certains scientifiques.
Albert Einstein, notamment, travaillait toujours de manière intuitive, en partant d’un récit. Le physicien pensait par exemple à des jumeaux. L’un prend le train, l’autre se trouve abandonné sur le quai de la gare. Mais ils se retrouvent quelques années plus tard. « Ont-ils vieilli de la même manière ? se demande Nolan. Il y a une certaine mélancolie dans la réponse à une telle question qui illustre à merveille les lois de la physique quantique. »
Le cinéma lui a permis de trouver cette mélancolie, d’apposer de la tristesse au monde apparemment mécanique de la science. Pour lui, les avancées technologiques révèlent une immense solitude. Voilà ce qui l’a toujours frappé dans 2001 et qu’il n’en finit plus de contempler à chaque visionnage : l’humanité, à sa toute petite échelle, confrontée à l’immensité de l’univers.
Alors Nolan regarde les détails qui l’entourent. Il scrute son univers, jusqu’à sa tasse de thé. Il observe le liquide, étudie sa teinte, la théine qui se concentre dans l’eau chaude, la température qui baisse doucement. Cela lui permet de s’échapper de la conversation et retourner à son isolement. Seul dans ses pensées. Là où il s’épanouit.
submitted by Ichbinian to tenet [link] [comments]


2020.07.15 08:06 INFPindahouse Aw

2018 * Best film: Under the Silver Lake (David Robert Mitchell) * Best director: Burning (Lee Chang-dong) * Best actor: Vice (Christian Bale) * Best actress: * Best supporting actor: * Best supporting actress: * Best original screenplay: Under the Silver Lake (David Robert Mitchell) * Best adapted screenplay: Burning (Lee Chang-Dong & Jungmi Oh) * Best foreign film: Burning (Lee Chang-dong) * Best cinematography: Cold War (Lukasz Zal) * Best editing: * Best score: Burning (Mowg) * Best art direction: The Favourite (Fiona Crombie & Alice Felton) * Best sound: First Man * Best VFX: First Man
2017 * Best film: Good Time (Benny & Josh Safdie) * Best director: Good Time (Benny & Josh Safdie) * Best actor: Good Time (Robert Pattinson) * Best actress: Three Billboards (Frances McDormand) * Best supporting actor: Three Billboards (Sam Rockwell) * Best supporting actress: I, Tonya (Allison Janney) * Best original screenplay: The Shape of Water (Guillermo Del Toro) * Best adapted screenplay: The Disaster Artist * Best foreign film: * Best cinematography: Blade Runner 2049 (Roger Deakins) * Best editing: Dunkirk (Lee Smith) * Best score: Good Time * Best art direction: The Shape of Water * Best sound: Blade Runner 2049 * Best VFX: Blade Runner 2049
2016 * Best film: Silence * Best director: Silence * Best actor: Manchester by the Sea * Best actress: Jackie * Best supporting actor:
submitted by INFPindahouse to u/INFPindahouse [link] [comments]


2020.07.11 08:17 subreddit_stats Subreddit Stats: DC_Cinematic top posts from 2019-07-08 to 2020-07-06 15:44 PDT

Period: 364.15 days
Submissions Comments
Total 999 116258
Rate (per day) 2.74 316.12
Unique Redditors 356 17851
Combined Score 1813100 1524088

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 136099 points, 61 submissions: chanma50
    1. News: Zack Snyder Will Release the ‘Snyder Cut’ of ‘Justice League’ on HBO Max (15349 points, 2018 comments)
    2. News: Henry Cavill is in talks to reprise his role as Superman in the Warner Bros. DC Universe. (8152 points, 724 comments)
    3. Appreciation: "I'm standing here on the shoulders of my favorite actor Heath Ledger." - Joaquin Phoenix wins SAG Award 11 years after Gary Oldman accepted the posthumous SAG Award on behalf of Heath Ledger. (4278 points, 79 comments)
    4. News: Batman Returns! Michael Keaton in Talks to Play Bruce Wayne in ‘The Flash’ Movie (4223 points, 679 comments)
    5. News: Joaquin Phoenix wins Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture — Drama for Joker. (3856 points, 148 comments)
    6. Fan-made: Justice League, by @godot_23. (3451 points, 91 comments)
    7. Article: Henry Cavill on the Superman rumors - “If people are chatting about it and even if they’re making stuff up, it’s okay, that means they want to see the character again. And in an ideal world, I would absolutely love to play the character again.” (2972 points, 167 comments)
    8. News: Todd Phillips and Joaquin Phoenix accepting the Golden Lion for Best Film at the Venice Film Festival (2972 points, 169 comments)
    9. Fan-made: Oscars 2009 and 2020 (credit: @ultraraw26 and @houseofmat) (2970 points, 33 comments)
    10. Social media: James Gunn shares his thoughts on GOTG Vol 3 and The Suicide Sqaud. The former likely would have been released today. (2459 points, 197 comments)
  2. 134101 points, 69 submissions: donbosco2017
    1. APPRECIATION: I love it when DC movies have stuff like this. (5253 points, 171 comments)
    2. HUMOR: The other team wished they had Victor Stone. (4446 points, 90 comments)
    3. OTHER: 3 Generations of The Bat Trinity! (3685 points, 306 comments)
    4. COSPLAY: " You are not brave. Men are brave! It's time you learned what it means to be a man. " (3662 points, 67 comments)
    5. HUMOR: Tragedy right after watching a comedy. (3591 points, 100 comments)
    6. APPRECIATION+HUMOR: 4 significant Bat Generations. (3581 points, 241 comments)
    7. COSPLAY: When you live long enough to..... (3554 points, 109 comments)
    8. OTHER: One Batmobile per decade since 2000. I hope Battinson remains our Batman for the entirety of this decade. (3482 points, 383 comments)
    9. APPRECIATION: Impactful Soundtrack by a very good composer! (3219 points, 114 comments)
    10. HUMOR: "What I do is not up to you." (3040 points, 26 comments)
  3. 94457 points, 57 submissions: AldebaranTauro
    1. NEWS: WW84 new trailer (5154 points, 791 comments)
    2. HUMOR: Henry Cavill reply to Ryan Reynolds for the mustache joke (4756 points, 153 comments)
    3. OTHER: Ben Affleck expressing his love for Zack Snyder and thank the fans (3236 points, 338 comments)
    4. FANART: 'The creation of A New #Joker' by ultraraw26 & houseofmat (3076 points, 48 comments)
    5. APPRECIATION: Celebrating as it should (3030 points, 78 comments)
    6. HUMOR: Exclusive and full look at Superman face (and neeeeeeeck) in Shazam movie by David F. Sandberg (2901 points, 67 comments)
    7. APPRECIATION: The moment they seal Joaquin's name at his Oscar (2800 points, 67 comments)
    8. OTHER: Gorgeous Diana (WW84 new still) (2719 points, 56 comments)
    9. OTHER: Joker Movie BTS pic by cinematographer Lawrence Sher (2579 points, 30 comments)
    10. OTHER: Likeness (2564 points, 83 comments)
  4. 92474 points, 57 submissions: BeenTryin
    1. APPRECIATION: The Variety. (3650 points, 373 comments)
    2. VERO: Zack Snyder shares video of Ben Affleck doing push-ups on set of Batman V Superman (3224 points, 266 comments)
    3. VERO: Zack Snyder shares a photo of the Trinity (2977 points, 327 comments)
    4. JL: Gal Gadot's body double Caitlin Burles just shared these behind the scenes set photos on IG. (2917 points, 112 comments)
    5. SOCIAL MEDIA: Jason Momoa on IG: "Release The ****** Snyder Cut" (2899 points, 248 comments)
    6. BVS: Bruce Wayne running towards chaos while everyone else is running away is so powerful. (2705 points, 282 comments)
    7. VERO: Zack Snyder thanks fans for putting up a #ReleaseTheSnyderCut billboard in Times Square. "This is truly amazing and I am Speechless and humbled by the support and love" (2436 points, 179 comments)
    8. JL: Snyder Cut promotion in SDCC has started. Money was raised by fans (50% goes to Foundation for Suicide Prevention). There's a bus stop with Justice League themed art and quotes from people who worked on the movie (photo by Will Rowlands). (2425 points, 290 comments)
    9. VERO: If you had any doubt who Bruce was looking at... (2418 points, 153 comments)
    10. HUMOR: Zack Snyder's Justice League. (2350 points, 36 comments)
  5. 69573 points, 39 submissions: bewarey
    1. OTHER: Me when they warned Joker would cause incel violence vs me when Joker caused no violence whatsoever and will gross over $1 billion (3991 points, 144 comments)
    2. APPRECIATION: They mean something (2951 points, 103 comments)
    3. OTHER: Margot Robbie training for Birds of Prey (2933 points, 266 comments)
    4. OTHER: Happy 49th birthday to Todd Phillips, the director of Joker (2577 points, 31 comments)
    5. OTHER: Make it happen WB (2547 points, 97 comments)
    6. OTHER: Oh boy.. (2540 points, 117 comments)
    7. OTHER: New Snyder Cut Batman pic (2516 points, 279 comments)
    8. OTHER: New Wonder Woman 1984 Poster (2503 points, 200 comments)
    9. HUMOR: Who is protecting whom? (2424 points, 129 comments)
    10. APPRECIATION: The DC Extended Universe (2373 points, 376 comments)
  6. 39632 points, 26 submissions: cryptic_nightowl
    1. OTHER: Snyder confirms it’s not an assembly cut (3549 points, 475 comments)
    2. OTHER: Darkseid is coming to HBOMax (3446 points, 302 comments)
    3. OTHER: Zack Snyder thanks fans for helping raise $200k for suicide awareness and prevention (3086 points, 50 comments)
    4. OTHER: Ray Fisher on Twitter (2836 points, 141 comments)
    5. OTHER: More pictures of the incredibly detailed shrine (2500 points, 84 comments)
    6. OTHER: Zack Snyder shared photo of Gal Gadot performing ADR (late stages of production) (2067 points, 223 comments)
    7. SOCIAL MEDIA: HBO Asia reacts to the Snyder Cut Promotion at SDCC 2019. (1882 points, 200 comments)
    8. OTHER: [Snyder Cut] Atlanteans vs Parademons in Iceland (Credit: @BigMonkeyLuvr25 on twitter) (1721 points, 37 comments)
    9. VIDEO: Flash running (Extended, Color corrected - VFX Reel) (1703 points, 110 comments)
    10. FAN-MADE: Joker by Datrinti (1664 points, 17 comments)
  7. 31345 points, 20 submissions: LookAtMyEyess
    1. APPRECIATION: Aquaman and The Flash saving Hawaii (3380 points, 133 comments)
    2. HUMOR: The best thing i saw today (3235 points, 41 comments)
    3. OTHER: This is why i love this guy! (2892 points, 63 comments)
    4. NEWS: ALL DC MOVIES WILL BE AVAILABLE ON HBO MAX AT LAUNCH INCLUDING JOKER (2688 points, 280 comments)
    5. OTHER: Robert Pattinson's different accents and voices (2244 points, 112 comments)
    6. OTHER: Actress Karen Gillan said that she would love to play and direct Batgirl. (Source:omele) (2175 points, 207 comments)
    7. OTHER: CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS QWTF WTF WTF WTF WTF (2170 points, 428 comments)
    8. OTHER:The Rock training for the Black Adam movie. (1924 points, 202 comments)
    9. OTHER:@ErickWeber says this about Joaquin Phoenix's Joker (1890 points, 247 comments)
    10. NEWS:Art director Joe Howard has come aboard Matt Reeves' The Batman! His recent credits include Kingsman: The Secret Service, Overlord, and Spider-Man: Far From Home (1225 points, 51 comments)
  8. 30780 points, 18 submissions: NineZeroFour
    1. Other: It’s February 19, Happy Birthday to Bruce Wayne (3193 points, 87 comments)
    2. Fan-made: Ana de Armas as Power Girl (art by Datrinti) (2889 points, 311 comments)
    3. NEWS: Dwayne Johnson’s ‘Black Adam’ Will Feature Doctor Fate & Isis (2613 points, 256 comments)
    4. OTHER: Margot Robbie will be on Hot Ones this week promoting Birds of Prey (2429 points, 59 comments)
    5. OTHER: Guillermo del Toro says he “loved developing” Justice League Dark. Would you want him to return to make it? (2355 points, 184 comments)
    6. OTHER: One of the best Robert Pattinson Batman Concepts I’ve Seen (2326 points, 115 comments)
    7. OTHER: DC's Trinity reimagined as Grandmasters of hand to hand combat, by Nikola Cizmesija (1961 points, 65 comments)
    8. OTHER: Hildur Guđnadóttir wins best original score for "Joker" at the BAFTAs. (1926 points, 68 comments)
    9. Fan-made: Matt Reeves’ The Batman in the style of the 2004 The Batman animated show (artist: Nerdpeace) (1775 points, 55 comments)
    10. Fan-made: ‘The Batman’ Vector Illustration by Cristhian Hova (1633 points, 25 comments)
  9. 27174 points, 14 submissions: aduong
    1. Other: Happy Birthday To Christian Bale, The Batman of a Generation. (4494 points, 163 comments)
    2. OTHER: New WW84 Still (2735 points, 138 comments)
    3. News: Wonder Woman 1984 on the cover of Entertainment Weekly (2722 points, 110 comments)
    4. Social Media: WW84 cast celebrating Pedro Pascal’s birthday. (2265 points, 54 comments)
    5. Other: WW84 on the WB lot (2222 points, 54 comments)
    6. Appreciation: HAPPY BIRTHDAY to Gal Gadot, our very own Wonder Woman!!! (2055 points, 67 comments)
    7. Appreciation: Superman Turns 82 Today (1996 points, 129 comments)
    8. Appreciation: Regardless fo how it does let’s give credit where credit is due to the brains behind BOP for extending DC’s streak of critical win. (1929 points, 160 comments)
    9. Humor: Quarantine struggle (1570 points, 48 comments)
    10. Other: Freaking the hell out the whole BOP cast just randomly rolled up in Time Square, I’m here for work dinnemeeting and I wanna die. (1371 points, 41 comments)
  10. 26373 points, 8 submissions: Othmane_K
    1. HUMOR: Some humor in this difficult times (5824 points, 86 comments)
    2. OTHER: Different designs, same hype (4145 points, 390 comments)
    3. Humor: Batman knows (4116 points, 83 comments)
    4. OTHER: TDK’s trilogy ending was just perfect from Nolan 👌 (3552 points, 286 comments)
    5. OTHER: Master Wayne (2766 points, 304 comments)
    6. OTHER: 🦇 vigilante (2507 points, 173 comments)
    7. OTHER: Small interesting detail (Credit : dc_fans_kerala) (2483 points, 150 comments)
    8. OTHER: The Batman (980 points, 95 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. xenocide0909 (15102 points, 152 comments)
  2. Cottril (13454 points, 306 comments)
  3. DoctorBeatMaker (13029 points, 206 comments)
  4. JeremySchmidtAfton (11332 points, 1244 comments)
  5. SonOfOriginalMan (10903 points, 472 comments)
  6. DarkLordRyan (10347 points, 988 comments)
  7. beachsidevibe (9123 points, 280 comments)
  8. leos-rdt (9079 points, 111 comments)
  9. BatmanNewsChris (7726 points, 106 comments)
  10. FewWatermelonlesson0 (7523 points, 266 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. News: Zack Snyder Will Release the ‘Snyder Cut’ of ‘Justice League’ on HBO Max by chanma50 (15349 points, 2018 comments)
  2. News: Henry Cavill is in talks to reprise his role as Superman in the Warner Bros. DC Universe. by chanma50 (8152 points, 724 comments)
  3. NEWS: First look at Zack Snyder’s Justice League from Jason Momoa’s Instagram! by Bman1738 (7558 points, 807 comments)
  4. NEWS: First look at the new Batsuit!!! (Matt Reeves The Batman camera test) by BatmanNewsChris (7048 points, 1030 comments)
  5. OTHER: Zack just posted this. Yet another confirmation it exists 😍 by the_white_portuguese (6857 points, 1079 comments)
  6. Social Media: Joss Wheadon’s on-set treatment of the cast and crew of Justice League was gross, abusive, unprofessional, and completely unacceptable. He was enabled, in many ways, by Geoff Johns and Jon Berg. Accountability>Entertainment by Doctor_Of_Fate (6284 points, 1221 comments)
  7. HUMOR: Some humor in this difficult times by Othmane_K (5824 points, 86 comments)
  8. Other: Filming of that iconic™ scene by AZAR0V (5299 points, 151 comments)
  9. APPRECIATION: I love it when DC movies have stuff like this. by donbosco2017 (5253 points, 171 comments)
  10. NEWS: WW84 new trailer by AldebaranTauro (5154 points, 791 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 1535 points: itsallajoke_'s comment in News: Zack Snyder Will Release the ‘Snyder Cut’ of ‘Justice League’ on HBO Max
  2. 1407 points: leos-rdt's comment in NEWS: First look at the new Batsuit!!! (Matt Reeves The Batman camera test)
  3. 1404 points: KingBrandoTheIgit's comment in NEWS: First look at Zack Snyder’s Justice League from Jason Momoa’s Instagram!
  4. 1385 points: btm29's comment in NEWS: Set Photo of Batman from Matt Reeves's The Batman
  5. 1370 points: deleted's comment in OTHER: CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS QWTF WTF WTF WTF WTF
  6. 1358 points: booojangles13's comment in Social Media: Joss Wheadon’s on-set treatment of the cast and crew of Justice League was gross, abusive, unprofessional, and completely unacceptable. He was enabled, in many ways, by Geoff Johns and Jon Berg. Accountability>Entertainment
  7. 1258 points: xenocide0909's comment in NEWS: Dwayne Johnson’s ‘Black Adam’ Will Feature Doctor Fate & Isis
  8. 1231 points: alauzon's comment in OTHER: Leto’s Joker (with eyebrows and without the grills and tattoos)
  9. 1165 points: BobDylanFeverDream's comment in News: Zack Snyder Will Release the ‘Snyder Cut’ of ‘Justice League’ on HBO Max
  10. 1131 points: leeroyschicken77's comment in OTHER: Different designs, same hype
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]


2020.06.13 15:54 pax_penguina Pax_Penguina #44-53: The VelociPastor (2018), The Lighthouse (2019), Suspiria (2018), Friday the 13th (1980), Altered Carbon: Resleeved (2020), Child's Play (1988), It Comes At Night (2017), Candyman (1990), The Vault (2017), Bloodshot (2020)

Hey folks, I'm back! I'm getting back into the movie grind, and I wanted to drop these reviews before I start watching a popular film trilogy later tonight. It's been a while since I've seen these films, probably almost a month since I saw VelociPastor, so my reviews aren't going to be as long or eloquent as I like to make them. Just a few sentences going over my opinion of each movie. I initially waited to write reviews for these films because I had so much to say about a bunch of them, but now that I've processed the films and talked about them to other actual human beings, I can sum up my thoughts nicely.
Reviews will be numbered by watch date. I don't remember the specific days I saw these films, but I know it was late May/early June, Basically the week before and the week after Memorial Day in the U.S. Alright, here goes nothing!
1) The VelociPastor (2018)
Wow, this was a fun movie. I can't remember the last time I watched an amateindie project like this, but it was a breath of fresh air from the studio-curated blockbusters and star vehicles I had been watching previously. It doesn't push any boundaries or ask any questions that stick in your brain for days on end, it's just pure fun and ridiculousness. You can tell the cast and crew had a good time making this film, and I hope filmmaker Brendan Steere gets to make more B-movie romps like this. 7/10
2) The Lighthouse (2019)
As soon as the credits started rolling, I could tell this was in my top twenty films of all time list. Gods, it's so weird and unnerving and uncomfortable at times, but that's what makes it a masterpiece. Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe will never hear criticism from me on their acting chops again, this film proves that they can absolutely control the screen and the audience's attention when given the right material. And that ending? smooches the air Magnificent. 9/10
3) Suspiria (2018)
I remember not being able to fall asleep a few weeks ago, and I was scrolling through Amazon Prime around 2 in the morning, and I settled on this film because I knew people were hotly anticipating it before its release. I haven't seen the original, but now I desperately want to, because Suspiria (2018) is an eclectic film for sure, but there's so much to enjoy about it. The atmosphere it gives off in the first two acts gives right proper chills, and the power play at the core of the plot was intriguing to watch, especially as they continued their activities. I would definitely watch this film again after seeing the original. Heck, you might see a review of the original Suspiria from me sometime soon now! 7.5/10
4) Friday the 13th (1980)
The worst part about this film, for me, was knowing the plot twist beforehand. I wish I could've watched this film with fresh-faced wonder, not knowing the truth behind the murders at Crystal Lake, both past and present, but I will say that I think knowing the twist robbed some of the impact for me. Aside from that though, the movie is an undeniable classic, and watching it for the first time was illuminating. Watching the film that's served as a blueprint/inspiration for so many horror projects that have come out since, it was almost rewarding to see how some of the horror genre's most popular and pervasive tropes showed up in this film. That's why I love watching older films, and while I'm not head-over-heels about the first Friday the 13th, maybe I'll enjoy the other movies with Jason Vorhees. 7.5/10
5) Altered Carbon: Resleeved (2020)
Just as The VelociPastor was a nice break from big-budget studio films, Altered Carbon: Resleeved (AC:R) was a nice break from live-action films. During my break I binge-watched a few tv shows, and Altered Carbon was my favorite new show I saw in that group. I'll hold my appreciation for the show, because if not then this would turn into a goddamn novel, but I will say that I enjoyed what AC:R brought to the table. I haven't read the books the show is based on, but the film was pretty decent, at least to me. I know a lot of Altered Carbon fans didn't like it because it was basically an extra-long and animated episode of the show, but that's kind of why I liked it so much. I didn't have to worry about being disappointed by any new information or reveals like I did with S2 (slight spoiler?). The dialogue is pretty shallow to be fair, and while I personally like the art style, it does look very much like it was lifted from a 2018 video game. But for all of the average-at-best qualities this film has, I'll take it. It gets me excited to see what else Netflix will do with Altered Carbon spinoffs. I see this first project as a dip in the water, not going for anything new or explosive, but rather presenting all of the memorable and exhilarating aspects of the show and packaging it into a ~70min animated romp, with slick-n-sweet action scenes and a tense mystery behind it all. 6.5/10
6) Child's Play (1988)
I've seen a bunch of the other Chucky films before, it was kind of a guilty secret of mine that I hadn't watched the original Child's Play. But now that I have, it definitely cements my appreciation for the cutest serial killer on the market. It's a great film, and while it's shorter than I thought it would be, it uses its runtime masterfully, never missing a beat. I especially like the moments before Chucky is shown to be alive, how the camerawork and the music are handled to make the audience get on the edge of their toes. I know I would've loved this film if I saw it in theaters. 8/10
7) It Comes At Night (2017)
Meh. That's how I felt after the end of this film. It's not a bad movie by any means, and from a certain perspective, I can see how people would really enjoy this film and give it so much praise. Maybe if I was a few years older, or if I had seen more movies, I could appreciate more realistic approach this film takes towards an apocalyptic virus (I think that's the problem the characters are afraid of, it's never made clear in the film). But I was hoping for something a little more tangible, something that would make me quiver on the spot. What I got instead was a peek at "the power of fear," idk I saw that phrase in a review for the film. I'm sure some people love this film, but I'm not one of them. 6/10
8) Candyman (1990)
I won't say much because, like with the Altered Carbon show, if I start now I won't stop for a long time. I love this film, it's so fascinating! I'm very excited for the remake now, might even watch the Candyman sequels too. I want to see more horror films that deal with charged political and social issues like this. Candyman might not be perfect in how it discusses race and gender, but it did it a lot better than some films and shows I've seen, and it did it back in the 90s! 8.5/10
9) The Vault (2017)
It's kind of funny how heavily advertised James Franco's role in the film is, considering he has maybe 10-15 minutes of screen time, and I'm being very generous there. But regardless of that somewhat funny bit, I enjoyed The Vault. It's nothing super special or inventive, but the notion of a haunted bank vault was so improbably ridiculous to me that I had to watch the film to find out what happens. All things considered, it could've been a lot worse, for sure. It's pretty cheesy at times, especially with one of the death scenes, but I liked the backstory that lead to the current action, and while the drama between the three main siblings might've been a bit ham-fisted, it did make me wish for one or more of them to get fucked up by the vault, and they all kind of deserved it by the end of the film. The last scene was almost as bad as the final post credits scene in Justice League, but it's noy nearly as long, so it's forgivable. 7/10
10) Bloodshot (2020)
I briefly fell asleep twice during this film and I still didn't miss anything important. The movie operates almost exactly how you would expect after watching the trailers. I can't even picture more than three or four scenes from the movie, and only one of them wasn't in the trailers. If this film did anything for me (other than putting a knot in my neck), it made me want to see Vin Diesel in a legitimate drama film. Dude has some acting chops. Some. 6/10
Those are my thoughts on, well, all of those films! I've been sitting on these for a while, I've had this tab opened on my laptop for over two weeks now. I just couldn't watch another new film in good faith without jotting down my thoughts on this batch.
That being said, now I have just 47 films to go before I complete this challenge for myself. I'm compiling a list of movies I want to watch before this current run ends, though I am leaving some room for random streaming picks (I gotta watch Spike Lee's new film Da 5 Bloods on Netflix soon, you'll def see a review from me on it). As per the rules of the sub, I will make sure to post a list ranking each film in my run from best to worst once I hit film 100. Hopefully I don't "fuck up the curve" with some of the movies I'm planning on watching, they're almost all classics that I just haven't gotten around to seeing yet. This weekend, for instance, I'm finally going to sit down and watch the trilogy almost everyone has seen but me. Seriously, I've had people curse me out for not watching these films before, so now I'm finally going to do it. See y'all on Monday!
Thank you for reading my reviews, it means a lot! If you've seen any of these films and want to share your thoughts, you're more than welcome to do so in the comments section. I hope everyone is having a good day, I hope everyone is staying safe during the pandemic, I hope everyone reading this supports Black Lives Matter and people of color across the globe, and I wish everyone the best of luck with their quest!
submitted by pax_penguina to 100movies365days [link] [comments]


2020.05.29 20:34 JonnyBravo98 Flashpoint/Justice League Theory with Links and Sources

After the announcement of the Snyder Cut of Justice League, I began to think about the bigger picture concerning the DCEU. I think they’re taking the Snyder Cut of JL and using it to test out his original vision. A win-win for them: If they Snyder cut fails the blame will still fall on Zach and if it’s a success, they get partial credit and will still most likely move on from Snyder.
Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Shazam, and Batman’s films are already set in stone with only Ben Affleck being recast as Batman by Robert Pattinson.
What if they were to end Justice League with the introduction of the Flashpoint storyline. We see that Darkseid will make an appearance in Justice League. But seeing how the team can barely handle Stephenwolf I don’t see a way they could manage to push Darkseid back to Apokolips. What if instead, the team is pummeled by Darkseid and he begins to invade and terraform earth into Apokolips (Snyder recently posted this picture of Darkseid https://twitter.com/zacksnydestatus/1265631646159564800?s=21 ) Barry has no other option but to run back in time as a last second Hail Mary to the threat of Darkseid and his forces. There are two essential characters in the Flashpoint storyline: Thomas Wayne and Cyborg. I believe Ben Affleck could be cast as Thomas Wayne. Ray Fisher ,among others, has stated that cyborg would appear in a Flash movie multiple times.
Barry’s meddling with the time stream/line would bring unexpected changes to the world he thought he would be returning to such as his peers lives unknowingly being changed. The only events that would have occurred by this time Barry is returning to is Man of Steel (Chronologically WW 1, 2, then MOS). Other things would change such as Bruce Wayne & Alfred looking and (presumably) acting different as well. I know the idea sound iffy and I thought the same at first —
Then AT&T tweeted this in response to a fan asking will it be possible to see Ben Affleck as Batman in other future films: https://twitter.com/att/status/1263957772758126592?s=21 Notice they said “who” will answer the call, as if Pattinson hasn’t already been cast as Batman and started production.
With the announcement of JL premiering 2021 (I would assume Summer or early Fall with Batman most likely being pushed back to 2022) Zach Snyder also made a statement claiming the estimated budget would be around 30-40 million.
Maybe a week later Warner Media chairman & HBO Max boss Bob Greenblatt confirmed Snyder’s estimate was incorrect and it would exceed that, stating “It isn’t as easy as going into the vault and there’s a Snyder Cut sitting there to put out,” Greenblatt said. “Zack is actually building it and it’s complex, including – and I don’t wanna get into too much detail that we haven’t already talked about yet – but, new effects shots.”
Source: https://observer.com/2020/05/snyder-cut-budget-hbo-max-bob-greenblat-cost-justice-league/
https://www.indiewire.com/2020/05/hbo-max-boss-synder-cut-expensive-unfinished-1202233545/
I thought about what could be hiking up the price of the film because we were led to believe that the Snyder cut was at least partially done (Hence the uproar.)
Did the best research I could and found that Avengers Endgame VFX/production cost took up around 100 million of Endgames 356 million dollar budget. So how much the budget is, has yet to be released but it does say a lot that Snyder’s original number was so off that Greenblatt couldn’t possibly agree.
Even going as far back as 2014, the original Snyder-led DCEU slate showed us that following Justice League: Part 1 a Flash film would be next, then after a few movies lead up to Justice League: Part 2. And even back then I wondered why Flash’s first movie would be the Flashpoint story line, seeing as thought we wouldn’t even have had an proper film to look into Barry’s life (By the original time of the release would have been 2018, and the films before it being MOS, BVS, Suicide Squad, WW, and JL: Part 1).
Source: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20141015006276/en/Warner-Bros.-Details-Strategic-Content-Plans-Time#.VD6fRtTF9RG
I looked back at the movies following Justice League. Wonder Woman (1 & 2) take place in the past with her most recent appearance being 1984 so the events of JL hasn’t occurred yet. Aquaman’s only reference to JL is Mera stating “You took down Stephenwolf” nothing more. Shazam’s only reference is his souvenirs. One being a Batarang and the other being a magazine detailing the events of MOS. There being little to no reference of the events taking place after MOS.
Something like this seems likely to me as the cast has practically been lobbying alongside the fans and Snyder, which (in my opinion) prompts their involvement going forward. I know most fans believe Warner Bros. will keep the films separate but we know by now that the most important thing to studios is $ and they know that not only will a connected universe bring in money but it’s what the fans want to see.
submitted by JonnyBravo98 to comicbookmovies [link] [comments]


2020.05.29 18:45 JonnyBravo98 Discussion: Snyder Cut JL/Flashpoint Theory with Links and Sources

After the announcement of the Snyder Cut of Justice League, I began to think about the bigger picture concerning the DCEU.
Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Shazam, and Batman’s films are already set in stone with only Ben Affleck being recast as Batman by Robert Pattinson.
What if they were to end Justice League with the introduction of the Flashpoint storyline. We see that Darkseid will make an appearance in Justice League. But seeing how the team can barely handle Stephenwolf I don’t see a way they could manage to push Darkseid back to Apokolips. What if instead, the team is pummeled by Darkseid and he begins to invade and terraform earth into Apokolips (Snyder recently posted this picture of Darkseid https://twitter.com/zacksnydestatus/1265631646159564800?s=21 ) Barry has no other option but to run back in time as a last second Hail Mary to the threat of Darkseid and his forces. There are two essential characters in the Flashpoint storyline: Thomas Wayne and Cyborg. I believe Ben Affleck could be cast as Thomas Wayne. Ray Fisher ,among others, has stated that cyborg would appear in a Flash movie multiple times.
Barry’s meddling with the time stream/line would bring unexpected changes to the world he thought he would be returning to such as his peers lives unknowingly being changed. The only events that would have occurred by this time Barry is returning to is Man of Steel (Chronologically WW 1, 2, then MOS). Other things would change such as Bruce Wayne & Alfred looking and (presumably) acting different as well. I know the idea sound iffy and I thought the same at first —
Then AT&T tweeted this in response to a fan asking will it be possible to see Ben Affleck as Batman in other future films: https://twitter.com/att/status/1263957772758126592?s=21 Notice they said “who” will answer the call, as if Pattinson hasn’t already been cast as Batman and started production.
With the announcement of JL premiering 2021 (I would assume Summer or early Fall with Batman most likely being pushed back to 2022) Zach Snyder also made a statement claiming the estimated budget would be around 30-40 million.
Maybe a week later Warner Media chairman & HBO Max boss Bob Greenblatt confirmed Snyder’s estimate was incorrect and it would exceed that, stating “It isn’t as easy as going into the vault and there’s a Snyder Cut sitting there to put out,” Greenblatt said. “Zack is actually building it and it’s complex, including – and I don’t wanna get into too much detail that we haven’t already talked about yet – but, new effects shots.”
Source: https://observer.com/2020/05/snyder-cut-budget-hbo-max-bob-greenblat-cost-justice-league/
https://www.indiewire.com/2020/05/hbo-max-boss-synder-cut-expensive-unfinished-1202233545/
I thought about what could be hiking up the price of the film because we were led to believe that the Snyder cut was at least partially done (Hence the uproar.)
Did the best research I could and found that Avengers Endgame VFX/production cost took up around 100 million of Endgames 356 million dollar budget. So how much the budget is, has yet to be released but it does say a lot that Snyder’s original number was so off that Greenblatt couldn’t possibly agree.
Even going as far back as 2014, the original Snyder-led DCEU slate showed us that following Justice League: Part 1 a Flash film would be next, then after a few movies lead up to Justice League: Part 2. And even back then I wondered why Flash’s first movie would be the Flashpoint story line, seeing as thought we wouldn’t even have had an proper film to look into Barry’s life (By the original time of the release would have been 2018, and the films before it being MOS, BVS, Suicide Squad, WW, and JL: Part 1).
Source: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20141015006276/en/Warner-Bros.-Details-Strategic-Content-Plans-Time#.VD6fRtTF9RG
I looked back at the movies following Justice League. Wonder Woman (1 & 2) take place in the past with her most recent appearance being 1984 so the events of JL hasn’t occurred yet. Aquaman’s only reference to JL is Mera stating “You took down Stephenwolf” nothing more. Shazam’s only reference is his souvenirs. One being a Batarang and the other being a magazine detailing the events of MOS. There being little to no reference of the events taking place after MOS.
Something like this seems likely to me as the cast has practically been lobbying alongside the fans and Snyder, which (in my opinion) prompts their involvement going forward. I know most fans believe Warner Bros. will keep the films separate but we know by now that the most important thing to studios is $ and they know that not only will a connected universe bring in money but it’s what the fans want to see.
submitted by JonnyBravo98 to DC_Cinematic [link] [comments]


2020.05.29 01:34 JonnyBravo98 Flashpoint/Justice League Theory with Links and References

After the announcement of the Snyder Cut of Justice League, I began to think about the bigger picture concerning the DCEU.
Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Shazam, and Batman’s films are already set in stone with only Ben Affleck being recast as Batman by Robert Pattinson.
What if they were to end Justice League with the introduction of the Flashpoint storyline. We see that Darkseid will make an appearance in Justice League. But seeing how the team can barely handle Stephenwolf I don’t see a way they could manage to push Darkseid back to Apokolips. What if instead, the team is pummeled by Darkseid and he begins to invade and terraform earth into Apokolips (Snyder recently posted this picture of Darkseid https://twitter.com/zacksnydestatus/1265631646159564800?s=21 ) Barry has no other option but to run back in time as a last second Hail Mary to the threat of Darkseid and his forces. There are two essential characters in the Flashpoint storyline: Thomas Wayne and Cyborg. I believe Ben Affleck could be cast as Thomas Wayne. Ray Fisher ,among others, has stated that cyborg would appear in a Flash movie multiple times.
Barry’s meddling with the time stream/line would bring unexpected changes to the world he thought he would be returning to such as his peers lives unknowingly being changed. The only events that would have occurred by this time Barry is returning to is Man of Steel (Chronologically WW 1, 2, then MOS). Other things would change such as Bruce Wayne & Alfred looking and (presumably) acting different as well. I know the idea sound iffy and I thought the same at first —
Then AT&T tweeted this in response to a fan asking will it be possible to see Ben Affleck as Batman in other future films: https://twitter.com/att/status/1263957772758126592?s=21 Notice they said “who” will answer the call, as if Pattinson hasn’t already been cast as Batman and started production.
With the announcement of JL premiering 2021 (I would assume Summer or early Fall with Batman most likely being pushed back to 2022) Zach Snyder also made a statement claiming the estimated budget would be around 30-40 million.
Maybe a week later Warner Media chairman & HBO Max boss Bob Greenblatt confirmed Snyder’s estimate was incorrect and it would exceed that, stating “It isn’t as easy as going into the vault and there’s a Snyder Cut sitting there to put out,” Greenblatt said. “Zack is actually building it and it’s complex, including – and I don’t wanna get into too much detail that we haven’t already talked about yet – but, new effects shots.”
Source: https://observer.com/2020/05/snyder-cut-budget-hbo-max-bob-greenblat-cost-justice-league/
https://www.indiewire.com/2020/05/hbo-max-boss-synder-cut-expensive-unfinished-1202233545/
I thought about what could be hiking up the price of the film because we were led to believe that the Snyder cut was at least partially done (Hence the uproar.)
Did the best research I could and found that Avengers Endgame VFX/production cost took up around 100 million of Endgames 356 million dollar budget. So how much the budget is, has yet to be released but it does say a lot that Snyder’s original number was so off that Greenblatt couldn’t possibly agree.
Even going as far back as 2014, the original Snyder-led DCEU slate showed us that following Justice League: Part 1 a Flash film would be next, then after a few movies lead up to Justice League: Part 2. And even back then I wondered why Flash’s first movie would be the Flashpoint story line, seeing as thought we wouldn’t even have had an proper film to look into Barry’s life (By the original time of the release would have been 2018, and the films before it being MOS, BVS, Suicide Squad, WW, and JL: Part 1).
Source: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20141015006276/en/Warner-Bros.-Details-Strategic-Content-Plans-Time#.VD6fRtTF9RG
I looked back at the movies following Justice League. Wonder Woman (1 & 2) take place in the past with her most recent appearance being 1984 so the events of JL hasn’t occurred yet. Aquaman’s only reference to JL is Mera stating “You took down Stephenwolf” nothing more. Shazam’s only reference is his souvenirs. One being a Batarang and the other being a magazine detailing the events of MOS. There being little to no reference of the events taking place after MOS.
Something like this seems likely to me as the cast has practically been lobbying alongside the fans and Snyder, which (in my opinion) prompts their involvement going forward. I know most fans believe Warner Bros. will keep the films separate but we know by now that the most important thing to studios is $ and they know that not only will a connected universe bring in money but it’s what the fans want to see.
submitted by JonnyBravo98 to DCcomics [link] [comments]


2020.05.23 09:46 _WittyWoman High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...

Movie: High Life / Director: Claire Denis / Language: English / Genre: Sci-fi, mystery, thriller, drama
“Cruelty? What do you know about Cruelty?”
'High Life' is a “taboo” in the mainstream sci-fi space genre. If the earth is heaven, and the black hole is hell, here some people are drifting in cosmic chaos leading by sin. The film takes us to the eerie odyssey of a criminal-turned-astronaut (Robert Pattinson) into the infinite where time tests his and our patience. Believe me, there are no wars of stars or no one guards any galaxy, instead, here, characters are getting away from humanity and heading toward the bizarre black hole of immorality, sexploitation, existential crisis, loneliness, hollowness, and some fluid, some box, etc.!!
https://preview.redd.it/oaockqkqyg051.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=480195a900e40479ccfb5c656dd013aa99284915
The movie begins in a distant future where Monte (Robert) and an infant are all alone in a matchbox type spacecraft, where he is trying to take care of the child and controlling losing his mind. The story moves in a backward-forward manner, and we see a few other characters entirely driven by their basic instincts. The only authority they have is of white devilish doctor Dibs (Juliette Binoche), who does her gruesome sexual experiments. Interestingly, she is a doctor who has killed her children, now supervising breeding in the spaceship for the future generation, in her morbid way. Only Monte has not surrendered himself to such passion, maybe that’s why he has nicknamed as ‘monk’ on the ship, and among his crew members, he only survives to last.
https://preview.redd.it/rf78nmuryg051.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=e57d3b057cd85df683856c45deaa91ffe5a51b4e
This suicide squad of criminals is on a science mission to explore a new world. Facing the death penalty and life imprisonment, these young adult prisoners have accepted the suicidal journey where they have sent to harvest the energy of the nearest black hole for the earth and to come back. It’s like a substitute sentence. There is nothing heroic here. Like some waste, they are thrown out of the earth in a rubbish container looking spaceship. Since they are offenders serving their punishments in jails, and nobody will concern about them on the planet, they become the liable choice for this long term deadly mission.
The talented French filmmaker Claire Davis has created this whole metaphor where these people left out unconcerned by the entire cosmos, packed in a jailed-shaped-spaceship without parole and even cannot escape. It may seem sci-fi space movie, but it feels like a psychological drama where Clair experiments with the mind of the helpless people putting them in a situation from where they cannot run away, literally and metaphorically. There is so much emptiness is here. In a vessel like space, a vessel like a spaceship, with vessel-like humans, moving toward ultimate vessel black hole.
https://preview.redd.it/474cb81pyg051.jpg?width=3264&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=e9137fee87e105dda2526694bafac9fa00cc41f2
The movie asks so many questions. For how long can we control our desires? What is our pressure point? What if there is nowhere to escape? If there is no way back? The movie makes us realize that our life is already a suicidal journey since we are born because it will inevitably end at death. It is floating in the chaos of a world full of people yet empty. We all will be in the black hole of oblivion. We all are on the same journey in the same direction. But some of us follow animalist desires, breakdown quickly, surrender without a fight and die early and painfully. But some fight them, with strength, with hope and give meaning to the existence. Life is a journey in which where we are going is not important, but how we are going. It reminds a few lines of a beautiful Gujarati gazal:
જુદી જિંદગી છે મિજાજે – મિજાજે; જુદી બંદગી છે નમાજે – નમાજે.
છે એક જ સમંદર, થયું એટલે શું? જુદા છે મુસાફર જહાજે – જહાજે.
જીવન જેમ જુદાં છે કાયામાં જુદી, છે મૃત્યુય જુદાં જનાજે – જનાજે.
In the end, let’s avoid a void between us, give each other strength and support to ease the pain of the end.
“Shall we?”
submitted by _WittyWoman to underratedmovies [link] [comments]


2020.05.23 09:44 _WittyWoman High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...

High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...
Movie: High Life / Director: Claire Denis / Language: English / Genre: Sci-fi, mystery, thriller, drama
“Cruelty? What do you know about Cruelty?”
'High Life' is a “taboo” in the mainstream sci-fi space genre. If the earth is heaven, and the black hole is hell, here some people are drifting in cosmic chaos leading by sin. The film takes us to the eerie odyssey of a criminal-turned-astronaut (Robert Pattinson) into the infinite where time tests his and our patience. Believe me, there are no wars of stars or no one guards any galaxy, instead, here, characters are getting away from humanity and heading toward the bizarre black hole of immorality, sexploitation, existential crisis, loneliness, hollowness, and some fluid, some box, etc.!!
https://preview.redd.it/0ji4g19dyg051.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=1a4fa6a3f1dd36e10e03ed61f7875311dece4edc
The movie begins in a distant future where Monte (Robert) and an infant are all alone in a matchbox type spacecraft, where he is trying to take care of the child and controlling losing his mind. The story moves in a backward-forward manner, and we see a few other characters entirely driven by their basic instincts. The only authority they have is of white devilish doctor Dibs (Juliette Binoche), who does her gruesome sexual experiments. Interestingly, she is a doctor who has killed her children, now supervising breeding in the spaceship for the future generation, in her morbid way. Only Monte has not surrendered himself to such passion, maybe that’s why he has nicknamed as ‘monk’ on the ship, and among his crew members, he only survives to last.
https://preview.redd.it/707tnkreyg051.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=24ccd3ddb6bf245f58c2461a05161c983027238d
This suicide squad of criminals is on a science mission to explore a new world. Facing the death penalty and life imprisonment, these young adult prisoners have accepted the suicidal journey where they have sent to harvest the energy of the nearest black hole for the earth and to come back. It’s like a substitute sentence. There is nothing heroic here. Like some waste, they are thrown out of the earth in a rubbish container looking spaceship. Since they are offenders serving their punishments in jails, and nobody will concern about them on the planet, they become the liable choice for this long term deadly mission.
The talented French filmmaker Claire Davis has created this whole metaphor where these people left out unconcerned by the entire cosmos, packed in a jailed-shaped-spaceship without parole and even cannot escape. It may seem sci-fi space movie, but it feels like a psychological drama where Clair experiments with the mind of the helpless people putting them in a situation from where they cannot run away, literally and metaphorically. There is so much emptiness is here. In a vessel like space, a vessel like a spaceship, with vessel-like humans, moving toward ultimate vessel black hole.
https://preview.redd.it/jlvkmktbyg051.jpg?width=3264&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=9e95d48f021df55167da2667384679665d77bdef
The movie asks so many questions. For how long can we control our desires? What is our pressure point? What if there is nowhere to escape? If there is no way back? The movie makes us realize that our life is already a suicidal journey since we are born because it will inevitably end at death. It is floating in the chaos of a world full of people yet empty. We all will be in the black hole of oblivion. We all are on the same journey in the same direction. But some of us follow animalist desires, breakdown quickly, surrender without a fight and die early and painfully. But some fight them, with strength, with hope and give meaning to the existence. Life is a journey in which where we are going is not important, but how we are going. It reminds a few lines of a beautiful Gujarati gazal:
જુદી જિંદગી છે મિજાજે – મિજાજે; જુદી બંદગી છે નમાજે – નમાજે.
છે એક જ સમંદર, થયું એટલે શું? જુદા છે મુસાફર જહાજે – જહાજે.
જીવન જેમ જુદાં છે કાયામાં જુદી, છે મૃત્યુય જુદાં જનાજે – જનાજે.
In the end, let’s avoid a void between us, give each other strength and support to ease the pain of the end.
“Shall we?”
submitted by _WittyWoman to TrueFilm [link] [comments]


2020.05.23 09:39 _WittyWoman High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...

High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...
Movie: High Life / Director: Claire Denis / Language: English / Genre: Sci-fi, mystery, thriller, drama
“Cruelty? What do you know about Cruelty?”
'High Life' is a “taboo” in the mainstream sci-fi space genre. If the earth is heaven, and the black hole is hell, here some people are drifting in cosmic chaos leading by sin. The film takes us to the eerie odyssey of a criminal-turned-astronaut (Robert Pattinson) into the infinite where time tests his and our patience. Believe me, there are no wars of stars or no one guards any galaxy, instead, here, characters are getting away from humanity and heading toward the bizarre black hole of immorality, sexploitation, existential crisis, loneliness, hollowness, and some fluid, some box, etc.!!
https://preview.redd.it/xf8y8l8nxg051.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6354495b5b535b1d208898414f30ab6b7c452427
The movie begins in a distant future where Monte (Robert) and an infant are all alone in a matchbox type spacecraft, where he is trying to take care of the child and controlling losing his mind. The story moves in a backward-forward manner, and we see a few other characters entirely driven by their basic instincts. The only authority they have is of white devilish doctor Dibs (Juliette Binoche), who does her gruesome sexual experiments. Interestingly, she is a doctor who has killed her children, now supervising breeding in the spaceship for the future generation, in her morbid way. Only Monte has not surrendered himself to such passion, maybe that’s why he has nicknamed as ‘monk’ on the ship, and among his crew members, he only survives to last.
https://preview.redd.it/wckky4joxg051.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=91bdf5b1b54e153a5838f936a10c389e1f3d8c51
This suicide squad of criminals is on a science mission to explore a new world. Facing the death penalty and life imprisonment, these young adult prisoners have accepted the suicidal journey where they have sent to harvest the energy of the nearest black hole for the earth and to come back. It’s like a substitute sentence. There is nothing heroic here. Like some waste, they are thrown out of the earth in a rubbish container looking spaceship. Since they are offenders serving their punishments in jails, and nobody will concern about them on the planet, they become the liable choice for this long term deadly mission.
The talented French filmmaker Claire Davis has created this whole metaphor where these people left out unconcerned by the entire cosmos, packed in a jailed-shaped-spaceship without parole and even cannot escape. It may seem sci-fi space movie, but it feels like a psychological drama where Clair experiments with the mind of the helpless people putting them in a situation from where they cannot run away, literally and metaphorically. There is so much emptiness is here. In a vessel like space, a vessel like a spaceship, with vessel-like humans, moving toward ultimate vessel black hole.

https://preview.redd.it/p6uczu3kxg051.jpg?width=3264&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=47beffd4fd7bbe6013df1202d709c9e99ac4a072
The movie asks so many questions. For how long can we control our desires? What is our pressure point? What if there is nowhere to escape? If there is no way back? The movie makes us realize that our life is already a suicidal journey since we are born because it will inevitably end at death. It is floating in the chaos of a world full of people yet empty. We all will be in the black hole of oblivion. We all are on the same journey in the same direction. But some of us follow animalist desires, breakdown quickly, surrender without a fight and die early and painfully. But some fight them, with strength, with hope and give meaning to the existence. Life is a journey in which where we are going is not important, but how we are going. It reminds a few lines of a beautiful Gujarati gazal:
જુદી જિંદગી છે મિજાજે – મિજાજે; જુદી બંદગી છે નમાજે – નમાજે.
છે એક જ સમંદર, થયું એટલે શું? જુદા છે મુસાફર જહાજે – જહાજે.
જીવન જેમ જુદાં છે કાયામાં જુદી, છે મૃત્યુય જુદાં જનાજે – જનાજે.
In the end, let’s avoid a void between us, give each other strength and support to ease the pain of the end.
“Shall we?”
submitted by _WittyWoman to topfilms [link] [comments]


2020.05.23 09:37 _WittyWoman High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...

High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...
Movie: High Life / Director: Claire Denis / Language: English / Genre: Sci-fi, mystery, thriller, drama
“Cruelty? What do you know about Cruelty?”
'High Life' is a “taboo” in the mainstream sci-fi space genre. If the earth is heaven, and the black hole is hell, here some people are drifting in cosmic chaos leading by sin. The film takes us to the eerie odyssey of a criminal-turned-astronaut (Robert Pattinson) into the infinite where time tests his and our patience. Believe me, there are no wars of stars or no one guards any galaxy, instead, here, characters are getting away from humanity and heading toward the bizarre black hole of immorality, sexploitation, existential crisis, loneliness, hollowness, and some fluid, some box, etc.!!
https://preview.redd.it/682wpgg2xg051.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=4eee1c59bcb82059f69ee140ae93dafccf3cec65
The movie begins in a distant future where Monte (Robert) and an infant are all alone in a matchbox type spacecraft, where he is trying to take care of the child and controlling losing his mind. The story moves in a backward-forward manner, and we see a few other characters entirely driven by their basic instincts. The only authority they have is of white devilish doctor Dibs (Juliette Binoche), who does her gruesome sexual experiments. Interestingly, she is a doctor who has killed her children, now supervising breeding in the spaceship for the future generation, in her morbid way. Only Monte has not surrendered himself to such passion, maybe that’s why he has nicknamed as ‘monk’ on the ship, and among his crew members, he only survives to last.
https://preview.redd.it/09vmidk3xg051.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=74439d211051034b38e31399c16565789a74241d
This suicide squad of criminals is on a science mission to explore a new world. Facing the death penalty and life imprisonment, these young adult prisoners have accepted the suicidal journey where they have sent to harvest the energy of the nearest black hole for the earth and to come back. It’s like a substitute sentence. There is nothing heroic here. Like some waste, they are thrown out of the earth in a rubbish container looking spaceship. Since they are offenders serving their punishments in jails, and nobody will concern about them on the planet, they become the liable choice for this long term deadly mission.
The talented French filmmaker Claire Davis has created this whole metaphor where these people left out unconcerned by the entire cosmos, packed in a jailed-shaped-spaceship without parole and even cannot escape. It may seem sci-fi space movie, but it feels like a psychological drama where Clair experiments with the mind of the helpless people putting them in a situation from where they cannot run away, literally and metaphorically. There is so much emptiness is here. In a vessel like space, a vessel like a spaceship, with vessel-like humans, moving toward ultimate vessel black hole.
https://preview.redd.it/far535j0xg051.jpg?width=3264&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d09086b970d38adc0e4e6c450099538d8eb82a97
The movie asks so many questions. For how long can we control our desires? What is our pressure point? What if there is nowhere to escape? If there is no way back? The movie makes us realize that our life is already a suicidal journey since we are born because it will inevitably end at death. It is floating in the chaos of a world full of people yet empty. We all will be in the black hole of oblivion. We all are on the same journey in the same direction. But some of us follow animalist desires, breakdown quickly, surrender without a fight and die early and painfully. But some fight them, with strength, with hope and give meaning to the existence. Life is a journey in which where we are going is not important, but how we are going. It reminds a few lines of a beautiful Gujarati gazal:
જુદી જિંદગી છે મિજાજે – મિજાજે; જુદી બંદગી છે નમાજે – નમાજે.
છે એક જ સમંદર, થયું એટલે શું? જુદા છે મુસાફર જહાજે – જહાજે.
જીવન જેમ જુદાં છે કાયામાં જુદી, છે મૃત્યુય જુદાં જનાજે – જનાજે.
In the end, let’s avoid a void between us, give each other strength and support to ease the pain of the end.
“Shall we?”
submitted by _WittyWoman to scifi [link] [comments]


2020.05.23 09:17 _WittyWoman High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...

High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...
Movie: High Life / Director: Claire Denis / Language: English / Genre: Sci-fi, mystery, thriller, drama
“Cruelty? What do you know about Cruelty?”
'High Life' is a “taboo” in the mainstream sci-fi space genre. If the earth is heaven, and the black hole is hell, here some people are drifting in cosmic chaos leading by sin. The film takes us to the eerie odyssey of a criminal-turned-astronaut (Robert Pattinson) into the infinite where time tests his and our patience. Believe me, there are no wars of stars or no one guards any galaxy, instead, here, characters are getting away from humanity and heading toward the bizarre black hole of immorality, sexploitation, existential crisis, loneliness, hollowness, and some fluid, some box, etc.!!
https://preview.redd.it/l5xbqsizog051.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=7a887274ba848e8a004be4760330a041d295a121
The movie begins in a distant future where Monte (Robert) and an infant are all alone in a matchbox type spacecraft, where he is trying to take care of the child and controlling losing his mind. The story moves in a backward-forward manner, and we see a few other characters entirely driven by their basic instincts. The only authority they have is of white devilish doctor Dibs (Juliette Binoche), who does her gruesome sexual experiments. Interestingly, she is a doctor who has killed her children, now supervising breeding in the spaceship for the future generation, in her morbid way. Only Monte has not surrendered himself to such passion, maybe that’s why he has nicknamed as ‘monk’ on the ship, and among his crew members, he only survives to last.
https://preview.redd.it/8cou48i1tg051.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=023dd7a9586dacc21b68de39495aeb3bf0f5b4b1
This suicide squad of criminals is on a science mission to explore a new world. Facing the death penalty and life imprisonment, these young adult prisoners have accepted the suicidal journey where they have sent to harvest the energy of the nearest black hole for the earth and to come back. It’s like a substitute sentence. There is nothing heroic here. Like some waste, they are thrown out of the earth in a rubbish container looking spaceship. Since they are offenders serving their punishments in jails, and nobody will concern about them on the planet, they become the liable choice for this long term deadly mission.
The talented French filmmaker Claire Davis has created this whole metaphor where these people left out unconcerned by the entire cosmos, packed in a jailed-shaped-spaceship without parole and even cannot escape. It may seem sci-fi space movie, but it feels like a psychological drama where Clair experiments with the mind of the helpless people putting them in a situation from where they cannot run away, literally and metaphorically. There is so much emptiness is here. In a vessel like space, a vessel like a spaceship, with vessel-like humans, moving toward ultimate vessel black hole.
https://preview.redd.it/v24z0mfuog051.jpg?width=3264&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=0c147438a7cdb913ef7ad3e48e08a10416f8bf46
The movie asks so many questions. For how long can we control our desires? What is our pressure point? What if there is nowhere to escape? If there is no way back? The movie makes us realize that our life is already a suicidal journey since we are born because it will inevitably end at death. It is floating in the chaos of a world full of people yet empty. We all will be in the black hole of oblivion. We all are on the same journey in the same direction. But some of us follow animalist desires, breakdown quickly, surrender without a fight and die early and painfully. But some fight them, with strength, with hope and give meaning to the existence. Life is a journey in which where we are going is not important, but how we are going. It reminds a few lines of a beautiful Gujarati gazal:
જુદી જિંદગી છે મિજાજે – મિજાજે; જુદી બંદગી છે નમાજે – નમાજે.
છે એક જ સમંદર, થયું એટલે શું? જુદા છે મુસાફર જહાજે – જહાજે.
જીવન જેમ જુદાં છે કાયામાં જુદી, છે મૃત્યુય જુદાં જનાજે – જનાજે.
In the end, let’s avoid a void between us, give each other strength and support to ease the pain of the end.
“Shall we?”
submitted by _WittyWoman to movies [link] [comments]


2020.05.23 08:48 _WittyWoman High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...

Movie: High Life / Director: Claire Denis / Language: English / Genre: Sci-fi, mystery, thriller, drama
“Cruelty? What do you know about Cruelty?”
'High Life' is a “taboo” in the mainstream sci-fi space genre. If the earth is heaven, and the black hole is hell, here some people are drifting in cosmic chaos leading by sin. The film takes us to the eerie odyssey of a criminal-turned-astronaut (Robert Pattinson) into the infinite where time tests his and our patience. Believe me, there are no wars of stars or no one guards any galaxy, instead, here, characters are getting away from humanity and heading toward the bizarre black hole of immorality, sexploitation, existential crisis, loneliness, hollowness, and some fluid, some box, etc.!!
https://preview.redd.it/n1ctsjvqng051.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=a609ada6efc7c15d15500c1d8dd90c19bada93ac
The movie begins in a distant future where Monte (Robert) and an infant are all alone in a matchbox type spacecraft, where he is trying to take care of the child and controlling losing his mind. The story moves in a backward-forward manner, and we see a few other characters entirely driven by their basic instincts. The only authority they have is of white devilish doctor Dibs (Juliette Binoche), who does her gruesome sexual experiments. Interestingly, she is a doctor who has killed her children, now supervising breeding in the spaceship for the future generation, in her morbid way. Only Monte has not surrendered himself to such passion, maybe that’s why he has nicknamed as ‘monk’ on the ship, and among his crew members, he only survives to last.
https://preview.redd.it/ebkhatmwng051.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=a142758c6a2710a29c8a07f56a617b0c2c613f37
This suicide squad of criminals is on a science mission to explore a new world. Facing the death penalty and life imprisonment, these young adult prisoners have accepted the suicidal journey where they have sent to harvest the energy of the nearest black hole for the earth and to come back. It’s like a substitute sentence. There is nothing heroic here. Like some waste, they are thrown out of the earth in a rubbish container looking spaceship. Since they are offenders serving their punishments in jails, and nobody will concern about them on the planet, they become the liable choice for this long term deadly mission.
The talented French filmmaker Claire Davis has created this whole metaphor where these people left out unconcerned by the entire cosmos, packed in a jailed-shaped-spaceship without parole and even cannot escape. It may seem sci-fi space movie, but it feels like a psychological drama where Clair experiments with the mind of the helpless people putting them in a situation from where they cannot run away, literally and metaphorically. There is so much emptiness is here. In a vessel like space, a vessel like a spaceship, with vessel-like humans, moving toward ultimate vessel black hole.
https://preview.redd.it/31l521y5og051.jpg?width=3264&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=8ebc0038ebf4b2dc00f61d41f6da70c6bc8107a8
The movie asks so many questions. For how long can we control our desires? What is our pressure point? What if there is nowhere to escape? If there is no way back? The movie makes us realize that our life is already a suicidal journey since we are born because it will inevitably end at death. It is floating in the chaos of a world full of people yet empty. We all will be in the black hole of oblivion. We all are on the same journey in the same direction. But some of us follow animalist desires, breakdown quickly, surrender without a fight and die early and painfully. But some fight them, with strength, with hope and give meaning to the existence. Life is a journey in which where we are going is not important, but how we are going. It reminds a few lines of a beautiful Gujarati gazal:
જુદી જિંદગી છે મિજાજે – મિજાજે; જુદી બંદગી છે નમાજે – નમાજે.
છે એક જ સમંદર, થયું એટલે શું? જુદા છે મુસાફર જહાજે – જહાજે.
જીવન જેમ જુદાં છે કાયામાં જુદી, છે મૃત્યુય જુદાં જનાજે – જનાજે.
In the end, let’s avoid a void between us, give each other strength and support to ease the pain of the end.
“Shall we?”
submitted by _WittyWoman to moviereviews [link] [comments]


2020.05.23 08:37 _WittyWoman High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...

High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...
Movie: High Life / Director: Claire Denis / Language: English / Genre: Sci-fi, mystery, thriller, drama
“Cruelty? What do you know about Cruelty?”
'High Life' is a “taboo” in the mainstream sci-fi space genre. If the earth is heaven, and the black hole is hell, here some people are drifting in cosmic chaos leading by sin. The film takes us to the eerie odyssey of a criminal-turned-astronaut (Robert Pattinson) into the infinite where time tests his and our patience. Believe me, there are no wars of stars or no one guards any galaxy, instead, here, characters are getting away from humanity and heading toward the bizarre black hole of immorality, sexploitation, existential crisis, loneliness, hollowness, and some fluid, some box, etc.!!
https://preview.redd.it/eryx6p41mg051.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=1fa612b90ac5b2d02bd08ae87a81b0ee21c05776
The movie begins in a distant future where Monte (Robert) and an infant are all alone in a matchbox type spacecraft, where he is trying to take care of the child and controlling losing his mind. The story moves in a backward-forward manner, and we see a few other characters entirely driven by their basic instincts. The only authority they have is of white devilish doctor Dibs (Juliette Binoche), who does her gruesome sexual experiments. Interestingly, she is a doctor who has killed her children, now supervising breeding in the spaceship for the future generation, in her morbid way. Only Monte has not surrendered himself to such passion, maybe that’s why he has nicknamed as ‘monk’ on the ship, and among his crew members, he only survives to last.
https://preview.redd.it/1m75mm84mg051.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=47699a1317afae0859d78a6d1923960f79ba9fe5
This suicide squad of criminals is on a science mission to explore a new world. Facing the death penalty and life imprisonment, these young adult prisoners have accepted the suicidal journey where they have sent to harvest the energy of the nearest black hole for the earth and to come back. It’s like a substitute sentence. There is nothing heroic here. Like some waste, they are thrown out of the earth in a rubbish container looking spaceship. Since they are offenders serving their punishments in jails, and nobody will concern about them on the planet, they become the liable choice for this long term deadly mission.
The talented French filmmaker Claire Davis has created this whole metaphor where these people left out unconcerned by the entire cosmos, packed in a jailed-shaped-spaceship without parole and even cannot escape. It may seem sci-fi space movie, but it feels like a psychological drama where Clair experiments with the mind of the helpless people putting them in a situation from where they cannot run away, literally and metaphorically. There is so much emptiness is here. In a vessel like space, a vessel like a spaceship, with vessel-like humans, moving toward ultimate vessel black hole.
https://preview.redd.it/e0sqyvt5mg051.jpg?width=3264&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=a3ffebb6862c05a0335f943027b3596952f5abe0
The movie asks so many questions. For how long can we control our desires? What is our pressure point? What if there is nowhere to escape? If there is no way back? The movie makes us realize that our life is already a suicidal journey since we are born because it will inevitably end at death. It is floating in the chaos of a world full of people yet empty. We all will be in the black hole of oblivion. We all are on the same journey in the same direction. But some of us follow animalist desires, breakdown quickly, surrender without a fight and die early and painfully. But some fight them, with strength, with hope and give meaning to the existence. Life is a journey in which where we are going is not important, but how we are going. It reminds a few lines of a beautiful Gujarati gazal:
જુદી જિંદગી છે મિજાજે – મિજાજે; જુદી બંદગી છે નમાજે – નમાજે.
છે એક જ સમંદર, થયું એટલે શું? જુદા છે મુસાફર જહાજે – જહાજે.
જીવન જેમ જુદાં છે કાયામાં જુદી, છે મૃત્યુય જુદાં જનાજે – જનાજે.
In the end, let’s avoid a void between us, give each other strength and support to ease the pain of the end.
“Shall we?”
submitted by _WittyWoman to moviecritic [link] [comments]


2020.05.23 08:24 _WittyWoman IJW: High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...

Movie: High Life / Director: Claire Denis / Language: English / Genre: Sci-fi, mystery, thriller, drama
“Cruelty? What do you know about Cruelty?”
'High Life' is a “taboo” in the mainstream sci-fi space genre. If the earth is heaven, and the black hole is hell, here some people are drifting in cosmic chaos leading by sin. The film takes us to the eerie odyssey of a criminal-turned-astronaut (Robert Pattinson) into the infinite where time tests his and our patience. Believe me, there are no wars of stars or no one guards any galaxy, instead, here, characters are getting away from humanity and heading toward the bizarre black hole of immorality, sexploitation, existential crisis, loneliness, hollowness, and some fluid, some box, etc.!!
The movie begins in a distant future where Monte (Robert) and an infant are all alone in a matchbox type spacecraft, where he is trying to take care of the child and controlling losing his mind. The story moves in a backward-forward manner, and we see a few other characters entirely driven by their basic instincts. The only authority they have is of white devilish doctor Dibs (Juliette Binoche), who does her gruesome sexual experiments. Interestingly, she is a doctor who has killed her children, now supervising breeding in the spaceship for the future generation, in her morbid way. Only Monte has not surrendered himself to such passion, maybe that’s why he has nicknamed as ‘monk’ on the ship, and among his crew members, he only survives to last.
This suicide squad of criminals is on a science mission to explore a new world. Facing the death penalty and life imprisonment, these young adult prisoners have accepted the suicidal journey where they have sent to harvest the energy of the nearest black hole for the earth and to come back. It’s like a substitute sentence. There is nothing heroic here. Like some waste, they are thrown out of the earth in a rubbish container looking spaceship. Since they are offenders serving their punishments in jails, and nobody will concern about them on the planet, they become the liable choice for this long term deadly mission.
The talented French filmmaker Claire Davis has created this whole metaphor where these people left out unconcerned by the entire cosmos, packed in a jailed-shaped-spaceship without parole and even cannot escape. It may seem sci-fi space movie, but it feels like a psychological drama where Clair experiments with the mind of the helpless people putting them in a situation from where they cannot run away, literally and metaphorically. There is so much emptiness is here. In a vessel like space, a vessel like a spaceship, with vessel-like humans, moving toward ultimate vessel black hole.
The movie asks so many questions. For how long can we control our desires? What is our pressure point? What if there is nowhere to escape? If there is no way back? The movie makes us realize that our life is already a suicidal journey since we are born because it will inevitably end at death. It is floating in the chaos of a world full of people yet empty. We all will be in the black hole of oblivion. We all are on the same journey in the same direction. But some of us follow animalist desires, breakdown quickly, surrender without a fight and die early and painfully. But some fight them, with strength, with hope and give meaning to the existence. Life is a journey in which where we are going is not important, but how we are going. It reminds a few lines of a beautiful Gujarati gazal:
જુદી જિંદગી છે મિજાજે – મિજાજે; જુદી બંદગી છે નમાજે – નમાજે.
છે એક જ સમંદર, થયું એટલે શું? જુદા છે મુસાફર જહાજે – જહાજે.
જીવન જેમ જુદાં છે કાયામાં જુદી, છે મૃત્યુય જુદાં જનાજે – જનાજે.
In the end, let’s avoid a void between us, give each other strength and support to ease the pain of the end.
“Shall we?”
submitted by _WittyWoman to Ijustwatched [link] [comments]


2020.05.23 08:23 _WittyWoman High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...

Movie: High Life / Director: Claire Denis / Language: English / Genre: Sci-fi, mystery, thriller, drama
“Cruelty? What do you know about Cruelty?”
'High Life' is a “taboo” in the mainstream sci-fi space genre. If the earth is heaven, and the black hole is hell, here some people are drifting in cosmic chaos leading by sin. The film takes us to the eerie odyssey of a criminal-turned-astronaut (Robert Pattinson) into the infinite where time tests his and our patience. Believe me, there are no wars of stars or no one guards any galaxy, instead, here, characters are getting away from humanity and heading toward the bizarre black hole of immorality, sexploitation, existential crisis, loneliness, hollowness, and some fluid, some box, etc.!!
The movie begins in a distant future where Monte (Robert) and an infant are all alone in a matchbox type spacecraft, where he is trying to take care of the child and controlling losing his mind. The story moves in a backward-forward manner, and we see a few other characters entirely driven by their basic instincts. The only authority they have is of white devilish doctor Dibs (Juliette Binoche), who does her gruesome sexual experiments. Interestingly, she is a doctor who has killed her children, now supervising breeding in the spaceship for the future generation, in her morbid way. Only Monte has not surrendered himself to such passion, maybe that’s why he has nicknamed as ‘monk’ on the ship, and among his crew members, he only survives to last.
This suicide squad of criminals is on a science mission to explore a new world. Facing the death penalty and life imprisonment, these young adult prisoners have accepted the suicidal journey where they have sent to harvest the energy of the nearest black hole for the earth and to come back. It’s like a substitute sentence. There is nothing heroic here. Like some waste, they are thrown out of the earth in a rubbish container looking spaceship. Since they are offenders serving their punishments in jails, and nobody will concern about them on the planet, they become the liable choice for this long term deadly mission.
The talented French filmmaker Claire Davis has created this whole metaphor where these people left out unconcerned by the entire cosmos, packed in a jailed-shaped-spaceship without parole and even cannot escape. It may seem sci-fi space movie, but it feels like a psychological drama where Clair experiments with the mind of the helpless people putting them in a situation from where they cannot run away, literally and metaphorically. There is so much emptiness is here. In a vessel like space, a vessel like a spaceship, with vessel-like humans, moving toward ultimate vessel black hole.
The movie asks so many questions. For how long can we control our desires? What is our pressure point? What if there is nowhere to escape? If there is no way back? The movie makes us realize that our life is already a suicidal journey since we are born because it will inevitably end at death. It is floating in the chaos of a world full of people yet empty. We all will be in the black hole of oblivion. We all are on the same journey in the same direction. But some of us follow animalist desires, breakdown quickly, surrender without a fight and die early and painfully. But some fight them, with strength, with hope and give meaning to the existence. Life is a journey in which where we are going is not important, but how we are going. It reminds a few lines of a beautiful Gujarati gazal:
જુદી જિંદગી છે મિજાજે – મિજાજે; જુદી બંદગી છે નમાજે – નમાજે.
છે એક જ સમંદર, થયું એટલે શું? જુદા છે મુસાફર જહાજે – જહાજે.
જીવન જેમ જુદાં છે કાયામાં જુદી, છે મૃત્યુય જુદાં જનાજે – જનાજે.
In the end, let’s avoid a void between us, give each other strength and support to ease the pain of the end.
“Shall we?”
submitted by _WittyWoman to flicks [link] [comments]


2020.05.23 08:21 _WittyWoman High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...

High Life (2018): An eerie odyssey into oblivion...
Movie: High Life / Director: Claire Denis / Language: English / Genre: Sci-fi, mystery, thriller, drama
“Cruelty? What do you know about Cruelty?”
'High Life' is a “taboo” in the mainstream sci-fi space genre. If the earth is heaven, and the black hole is hell, here some people are drifting in cosmic chaos leading by sin. The film takes us to the eerie odyssey of a criminal-turned-astronaut (Robert Pattinson) into the infinite where time tests his and our patience. Believe me, there are no wars of stars or no one guards any galaxy, instead, here, characters are getting away from humanity and heading toward the bizarre black hole of immorality, sexploitation, existential crisis, loneliness, hollowness, and some fluid, some box, etc.!!
https://preview.redd.it/h0qaqnyeig051.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=3f9d7a951a16e43f21a87c639482f52c30c6b2c5
The movie begins in a distant future where Monte (Robert) and an infant are all alone in a matchbox type spacecraft, where he is trying to take care of the child and controlling losing his mind. The story moves in a backward-forward manner, and we see a few other characters entirely driven by their basic instincts. The only authority they have is of white devilish doctor Dibs (Juliette Binoche), who does her gruesome sexual experiments. Interestingly, she is a doctor who has killed her children, now supervising breeding in the spaceship for the future generation, in her morbid way. Only Monte has not surrendered himself to such passion, maybe that’s why he has nicknamed as ‘monk’ on the ship, and among his crew members, he only survives to last.
https://preview.redd.it/ergf7k6mig051.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=9ab502010cd8d248c177903c1652ddf1b8c8829b
This suicide squad of criminals is on a science mission to explore a new world. Facing the death penalty and life imprisonment, these young adult prisoners have accepted the suicidal journey where they have sent to harvest the energy of the nearest black hole for the earth and to come back. It’s like a substitute sentence. There is nothing heroic here. Like some waste, they are thrown out of the earth in a rubbish container looking spaceship. Since they are offenders serving their punishments in jails, and nobody will concern about them on the planet, they become the liable choice for this long term deadly mission.
The talented French filmmaker Claire Davis has created this whole metaphor where these people left out unconcerned by the entire cosmos, packed in a jailed-shaped-spaceship without parole and even cannot escape. It may seem sci-fi space movie, but it feels like a psychological drama where Clair experiments with the mind of the helpless people putting them in a situation from where they cannot run away, literally and metaphorically. There is so much emptiness is here. In a vessel like space, a vessel like a spaceship, with vessel-like humans, moving toward ultimate vessel black hole.
https://preview.redd.it/whgb7ht2jg051.jpg?width=3264&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=0d629ed73872acb4212e2a659088ca7c7d3bbdb0
The movie asks so many questions. For how long can we control our desires? What is our pressure point? What if there is nowhere to escape? If there is no way back? The movie makes us realize that our life is already a suicidal journey since we are born because it will inevitably end at death. It is floating in the chaos of a world full of people yet empty. We all will be in the black hole of oblivion. We all are on the same journey in the same direction. But some of us follow animalist desires, breakdown quickly, surrender without a fight and die early and painfully. But some fight them, with strength, with hope and give meaning to the existence. Life is a journey in which where we are going is not important, but how we are going. It reminds a few lines of a beautiful Gujarati gazal:
જુદી જિંદગી છે મિજાજે – મિજાજે; જુદી બંદગી છે નમાજે – નમાજે.
છે એક જ સમંદર, થયું એટલે શું? જુદા છે મુસાફર જહાજે – જહાજે.
જીવન જેમ જુદાં છે કાયામાં જુદી, છે મૃત્યુય જુદાં જનાજે – જનાજે.
In the end, let’s avoid a void between us, give each other strength and support to ease the pain of the end.
“Shall we?”
submitted by _WittyWoman to Cinema [link] [comments]